Undeniably splendid... Oxytropis splendens

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Hoy
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Joined: 2009-12-15

The seed I got from Lori germinated like cress and I have already planted out some not so small plants with even larger roots.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

Kelaidis wrote:

The Dolomites, eh? I feel so SORRY for you Ann!

I'd feel sorrier if an old friend of mine hadn't married an Italian who has a home in the Dolomites and has invited us to visit! Hurrah!

When will you be there?  You will go out of your mind if you're there for alpine bloom time. Think of a rocky alpine meadow with Sax. oppositifolia and Thlaspi rotundifolium growing like cress!

cohan
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Joined: 2011-02-03

Hoy wrote:

The seed I got from Lori germinated like cress and I have already planted out some not so small plants with even larger roots.

I have some unsown wild collected seed (and wild photos I'll dig up later, though no fuschia vistas where/when I have been).. did you do any pretreatment, Trond? or was it just warm germinating?

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

cohan wrote:

Hoy wrote:

The seed I got from Lori germinated like cress and I have already planted out some not so small plants with even larger roots.

I have some unsown wild collected seed (and wild photos I'll dig up later, though no fuschia vistas where/when I have been).. did you do any pretreatment, Trond? or was it just warm germinating?

I sowed some in situ but most in pots indoors with artificial light but no extra heating or other treatment. Quick germination. Planted them out at my mountain cabin last summer and had some really nice plants last fall. Now I wonder how they overwinter!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Scarification can usually hasten the germination of any Fabaceae seed.  I scarify all Oxytropis, Astragalus, Trifolium, etc. by rubbing the seeds across a fine half-round rat-tail file before sowing on moist medium... works very well!  

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

cohan
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Joined: 2011-02-03

Skulski wrote:

Scarification can usually hasten the germination of any Fabaceae seed.  I scarify all Oxytropis, Astragalus, Trifolium, etc. by rubbing the seeds across a fine half-round rat-tail file before sowing on moist medium... works very well!  

How picky is this process? One seed at a time carefully? Or are you able to put a number on the file at once and rub quickly? I've heard of putting sandpaper on the bottom of a vessel and shaking seed back and forth, not sure how good contact is like that...
Though if Trond got good germination with no scarification....

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Boland
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

Breaks my heart that I cannot grow any western Oxytropes or Astragulus in my garden....there are so many beauties that exist!

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

cohan wrote:

How picky is this process? One seed at a time carefully? Or are you able to put a number on the file at once and rub quickly? I've heard of putting sandpaper on the bottom of a vessel and shaking seed back and forth, not sure how good contact is like that...
Though if Trond got good germination with no scarification....

Some Fabaceae have thick, hard seed coats that take a long time to soften up (or just get moldy) so scarifying is very helpful especially for those.  The scarifying is easily done just by picking up a few or couple of seeds on a moistened fingertip and rubbing them along the file a bit (be careful not to grind the softer ones into dust!  :P)  Bigger seeds can be nicked through the seed coat with a blade or fingernail clippers.  I'm never planting more than a few seeds of anything so it's not too time-consuming.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

cohan
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Skulski wrote:

cohan wrote:

How picky is this process? One seed at a time carefully? Or are you able to put a number on the file at once and rub quickly? I've heard of putting sandpaper on the bottom of a vessel and shaking seed back and forth, not sure how good contact is like that...
Though if Trond got good germination with no scarification....

Some Fabaceae have thick, hard seed coats that take a long time to soften up (or just get moldy) so scarifying is very helpful especially for those.  The scarifying is easily done just by picking up a few or couple of seeds on a moistened fingertip and rubbing them along the file a bit (be careful not to grind the softer ones into dust!   :P)  Bigger seeds can be nicked through the seed coat with a blade or fingernail clippers.  I'm never planting more than a few seeds of anything so it's not too time-consuming.

I know some are espeically tough, and probably need scarification or a lot of patience, others are listed as 'easy warm germinators' though not all species are listed anywhere  ;D I'd like to plant a lot more than a few of some of the natives, no doubt some experimenting is in order...

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

McGregorUS
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Joined: 2009-12-18

Hi Lori

Love the Oxytropis - it is very pretty. If you collect any seed this year I would love some.

I quite agree with all your comments on scarifying. If I do it lupins and Astragalus germinate, if I don't, they don't. I just use very fine sandpaper and usually try an hold each one and just rub it across the paper. And that is OK unless the seeds are really small when it gets a bit more tricky.

Just getting Lupinus argenteus seedlings appearing from this year's seed exchange - very first of all my selections to germinate.

Malcolm McGregor
Global Moderator/NARGS Editor
East Yorkshire, UK

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