Two gardenworthy willows ... and two more!

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Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

I see a lot of really beautiful (and presumably, at least some must be garden-worthy) alpine willows in the mountains here... I only wish I could put names to them.  (According to Moss & Packer, there are 13 species that occur in alpine/subalpine habitats... so I think the odds are stacked against me!)
Here are a few attractive ones seen in alpine/sub-alpine areas.  Can anyone ID them?

1) Salix #1

2) Salix #2; plants in this thicket were up to ~1m tall.

3) Salix #3; low-growing but lanky/bare-stemmed.  (I suppose it may be the same as the previous one but more dwarfed?)

4) Salix reticulata... I think(?)

5) Salix vestita... ??  Covers the ground, reaching only ~1cm high, in many areas.
 

6) This is just a picture that I like... don't know the species of this Salix either.

7) A pretty Salix combo... possibly S. reticulata at the top and S. vestita below?

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Beautiful Salix Lori!  I could easily become a Salix hound.  I see that you're also making good use of the inline photo attachment capability, very nice... makes the text and photos become more of a dialog.

I'm still not able to connect to nargs.org for some mysterious reason, and I'm here at a public library using a PC to gain access :-\.  I hope to resolve the technical glitch this coming week.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Boland
Boland's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

Some great salix in the rockies!  In #7, the vestita is on the top and the reticulata is below.  #5 is also reticulata.  I have pics of that large catkin species as well but never got an ID.

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Paul wrote:

So how big do the silver Salix species grow to?  I wonder if they are already here in the country?  Seed cannot come in through quarantine unfortunately, but I am wondering whether any of these came previously?  There certainly ARE some miniature styles of Salix here in Aus, so they've been brought in at some point along the line.  I just wasn't aware there were ones like these with the lovely silver leaves.

If the silvery species already are in Aus I can't possibly tell but the species here (Ss. glauca, lapponum and lanata) grow to about 1m.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Lori,
pretty willows!
#3 looks similar to S. lanata catkins and #5 looks similar to S. polaris - but I don't know if they grow over there ???

Well, when I looked better - I am not sure the similarities are striking ;)

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Paul T
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

Trond,

So, perfect size for a garden then.  ;D  Thanks for the info.

Cheers.

Paul T.
Canberra, Australia.
Min winter temp -8 or -9°C. Max summer temp 40°C. Thankfully, maybe once or twice a year only.

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Wow! lots of great willows! There are bazillions of them here, but they are mostly multistemmed large shrubs/small trees to maybe 6-10m, though usually less and needing support of other trees or a dense clump of their own growth to get that tall--also here they often occur in damp to wet pastures, and in those settings they get periodically bulldozed and regrow from the roots..
We have some pretty ones, for sure, and if pruned could be really nice in the garden, including some silvery leafed types, a lot of variety in stem colour and catkins as well, many are very showy through numbers, though not large...

I've admired a few in the mountains, as Lori and Todd mentioned, but was never there at the right time for seed, and only saw them in parks, so could not take cuttings :(
We have one that my mother planted some years ago--a commercial variety--'arctic fox', or 'blue fox' or something like that-- maybe a metre and a half tall, nice, but not as white as Trond's forms!
Also one survivor in my old rock garden I planted as a teen from a snippet from somewhere in the Rockies also a little over a metre, also not a really flashy one...

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Cohan, maybe you'll show us again here on NARGS (for forumists who have not had the pleasure of seeing your extensive posts on SRGC), your photos of taller shrubby Salix species, but with early spring catkins of beautiful detail, color and form.  I was quite taken with those photos and the detail captured.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Sure, Mark, I will photograph and post them as they start in the spring again--I finally got the Flora of Alberta, and another book that has a bit of a section on willows, so I'm going to start trying to id at least some of the locals!
Here are some from last year in April, so I have some time to wait yet!
https://picasaweb.google.com/cactuscactus/April182010NorthernSpringWillo...
https://picasaweb.google.com/cactuscactus/April212010NorthernSpringSunse...
and a third album from early May (these are not all willow pics!) shows, I believe, a different species..
https://picasaweb.google.com/cactuscactus/May022010NorthernSpring#

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Todd wrote:

Some great salix in the rockies!  In #7, the vestita is on the top and the reticulata is below.  #5 is also reticulata.  I have pics of that large catkin species as well but never got an ID.

Thanks for the ID help, Todd.  It would be ideal to see these things in the presence of a botanist who could really explain the differences.  Failing that, I guess I'll have to study the field marks more and try to distinguish them.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

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