Two gardenworthy willows ... and two more!

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Hoy
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Joined: 2009-12-15
Two gardenworthy willows ... and two more!

These are rather common on mineral rich moist or wet soil but they also tolerate drier conditions.

Balistrieri
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Joined: 2009-11-04

Great to see Salix mentioned in the forums. I especially love the little ones and have grown them in the past (but not now...). I believe them to be among the most underappreciated plants. Thanks for posting.

Carlo A. Balistrieri
Flemington, NJ (smack dab between New York City and Philadelphia)
Zone 6

Boland
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Joined: 2009-09-25

Salix mysinites is new to me but I am very familiar with reticulata as they are common in northern Newfoundland.  I am at my brothers home in Calgary so have no access to my pictures, but other Newfoundland native willows which are very desiable are S. vestita, S. jejuna, S. calcicola, S. glauca (hugh variation in this species), S. weigandii, S. arctica, S. arctophila (just saw some of these in Glacier National park), S. uva-ursi (our only acid-loving species) and S. candida (this one is only suitable for larger rock gardens but have fantastic silver-white foliage).  I think northern newfoundland has some of the best varieties and most diversity of dwarf willows of anywhere in the world....go figure.

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

Hoy
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Joined: 2009-12-15

I should like to explore the willows (and other plants) of Newfoundland, Todd!

Here are two other gardenworthy willows - I do not like them if I have to walk through them but otherwise they are rather showy.

First "sølvvier" (Salix glauca)

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Hoy
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The second is "ullvier" (Salix lanata) by "Svartevatn" (= Black Lake).

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Boland
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Trond, are you sure your S. glauca is the real thing?  Glauca means smooth with a waxy bloom.....it is a common willow here but always smooth leaves (new ones may be a little hairy but this is lost as the leaves mature).  Your 'glauca' looks very much like our native S. candida (or the European S. helvatica).  If it really is glauca, then the Norway forms are very special indeed.

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

Hoy
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Todd wrote:

Trond, are you sure your S. glauca is the real thing?  Glauca means smooth with a waxy bloom.....it is a common willow here but always smooth leaves (new ones may be a little hairy but this is lost as the leaves mature).  Your 'glauca' looks very much like our native S. candida (or the European S. helvatica).  If it really is glauca, then the Norway forms are very special indeed.

I am not 100% sure. The Norwegian S. glauca has many forms and some can be hairy on both sides of the leaves. Neither  candida nor  helvetica occur here at all. We have 3 species with blue and more or less hairy leaves: lanata, glauca and lapponum. What I pictured is not lanata; and glauca and lapponum differ in taste of the leaves  and  size of catkins. I think I tasted the leaves too (glauca tastes bitter). But this shrub grew among other not so hairy ones. Lanata grew near by, I don't know if they can hybridise (many other hybrids are known).

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Paul T
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Joined: 2011-01-31

Wow, those silver Salix are amazing.  :o  Never seen anything like them before.

Sorry for activating this topic after so many months, but I've only just joined and exploring, so I'm finding lots of old topics that haven't been touched for a while.  I hope it is OK to post in them?  I just couldn't resist commenting on these silver willows....... they'd look brillliant in a garden situation as well, I'd imagine?

Cheers.

Paul T.
Canberra, Australia.
Min winter temp -8 or -9°C. Max summer temp 40°C. Thankfully, maybe once or twice a year only.

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

If it is interesting to you, Paul, than it is interesting to others too.  Digging up old threads like this is a good thing, especially since we are gaining more forum participants, with the open enrollment for the public, that haven't seen them before.  They are nice reminders for us who have been here from the beginning too.
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Trond, I somehow missed (before) your last entry here!  (So thanks for bringing this topic back, Paul...)  We don't have willows like this native to Minnesota, but those last two photos sure make me yearn for the crisp, cool lake mornings of northern Minnesota.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
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Joined: 2009-12-15

Paul wrote:

Wow, those silver Salix are amazing.  :o  Never seen anything like them before.

Sorry for activating this topic after so many months, but I've only just joined and exploring, so I'm finding lots of old topics that haven't been touched for a while.  I hope it is OK to post in them?  I just couldn't resist commenting on these silver willows....... they'd look brillliant in a garden situation as well, I'd imagine?

Revive whatever you want, Paul, and comment as well :o
Willows are pretty common here, especially on higher grounds, but not often used as garden shrubs. Those found in nurseries are usually foreign types, the native ones are "too common" I think. I have one in my garden taken as a small plant but willows are easily propagated from cuttings.

Would be too crispy today, Rick, wouldn't it?

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Paul T
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

So how big do the silver Salix species grow to?  I wonder if they are already here in the country?  Seed cannot come in through quarantine unfortunately, but I am wondering whether any of these came previously?  There certainly ARE some miniature styles of Salix here in Aus, so they've been brought in at some point along the line.  I just wasn't aware there were ones like these with the lovely silver leaves.

Cheers.

Paul T.
Canberra, Australia.
Min winter temp -8 or -9°C. Max summer temp 40°C. Thankfully, maybe once or twice a year only.

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