Trollius albiflorus

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Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27
Trollius albiflorus

Trollius albiflorus (syn. Trollius laxus ssp. albiflorus) is a common plant of wet alpine meadows, blooming shortly after the snow recedes. I find that the white ticking at the leaf-section junctions makes the plant readily identifiable amongst the other meadow foliage, after the bloom season.

http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?

Odd that e-Flora of North America claims it occurs in more-or-less acidic substrates, while it is also a common plant here in the front ranges of the northern Rockies, where extremely thick sections of limestone and dolomite form vast outcrop exposures and alkaline substrates.

http://linnet.geog.ubc.ca/Atlas/Atlas.aspx?sciname=Trollius%20albiflorus...
http://plants.usda.gov/java/nameSearch?keywordquery=trollius+albiflorus&...
http://www.swcoloradowildflowers.com/white%20enlarged%20photo%20pages/tr...

Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

You don't call this a globeflower, do you ;)
It is a nice plant and I intend to plant some at my cabin in the mountains :o

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Hoy wrote:

You don't call this a globeflower, do you ;)

As I'm sure you realize, Trond, globeflower is a common name for the genus.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Lori wrote:

Hoy wrote:

You don't call this a globeflower, do you ;)

As I'm sure you realize, Trond, globeflower is a common name for the genus.

Yes, I know, but does this species have a common name?

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

"Globe-flower" - as there are no others to confuse it with here, this is generally sufficient - or "white globe-flower", as indicated in the links I posted.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

OK, I hoped it had a special name, as "globe"flower isn't very descriptive ;)
The one found here is called "ballblom" (=ballflower) and is the common Trollius europaeus.
A picture from this site:

http://www.rolv.no/bilder/galleri/fjellplanter/trol_eur.htm

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Kelaidis
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Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-03

Lori! I am ASTONISHED at how white your Trollius albiflorus is! The plant must have been named for one like your's: here in the southern Rockies they are a tepid, lemonade color. Nothing to write home about. And they are IMPOSSIBLE to grow for us...

But their eastern cousin (which is endangered in many states) is a great garden plant. The picture below is of Trollius laxus v. laxus in the Rock Alpine Garden at DBG this past spring. The color is just a tad yellower than our local "tepidflorus" form.

Thanks!

For every minion of the peaks there are a dozen steppe children growing in the dry Continental heart of all hemispheres still unknown to horticulture.

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Well, I like both forms! Even the one with "tepid, lemonade color". Wouldn't mind growing any of them!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

maggiepie
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2009-12-15

I like them all too.
Had no idea you could get such small forms. :-[

Helen,
New Brunswick , Canada
zone 4b

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Interesting that there would be significant difference in the flower colour of T. albiflorus in the more southerly populations.  I haven't tried it in the garden, but should collect a little seed some time and give it a try.

Here is what I have as Trollius laxus, not near so yellow as the one you show either.  It's a really good garden plant here too, even in our relatively dry climate (though maybe not so different from yours re. precipitation(?), though it certainly gets a lot hotter there, Panayoti).
 

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

I never really thought about this before, until I notice how much Lori's photo of Trollius laxus looks like an anemone (at least to me):

Is there an easy way to differentiate between the two genera?

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

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