Trillium 2010

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Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

A first time bloom on Trillium gracile today, this plant from Texas (thanks Aaron).  It's rather neat and trim, looking somewhat like T. foetidissimum, but without a foetid scent.

Trillium vaseyi is a striking species with very large showy red blooms, the uniquely shaped full flowers 8 cm across. Known as Sweet Wakerobin, it is sweet secnted (not detectable on this cold day today). 

Now ready to open, the bud teasing me for a couple weeks, the suspense is killing me, a hybrid between T. vaseyi x T. grandiflorum blooming for the first time since I played around with pollen some years back.  The scenario is perfect, both parents are in view in my images, with the giant baby in the middle.  The foliage on the hybrid looks like like T. grandiflorum, just taller and much bigger, but the large, rather elongate downturned bud is clearly that of T. vaseyi influence.  Today, some flower color is peeking through, mostly dark red but some white is evident too!  Stay tuned.

T. vaseyi is well known to hybridize with T. rugelii, which I also grow, but I had wondered if it would cross with grandiflorum... evidently so.

Trillium vaseyi distribution map and info:
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=TRVA2
http://utc.usu.edu/factsheets/trillium/trillium_vaseyi/trillium_vaseyi.htm

Image:
http://plants.usda.gov/java/largeImage?imageID=trva2_003_ahp.tif

Trillium vaseyi (Sweet Wakerobin) in Flora of North America:
http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=1&taxon_id=242102017

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Kelaidis
Kelaidis's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-03

Hurry up! Mark....the suspense is killing us too! Let's see the hybrid's color!

I am imagining mocha or cappucino at least...

For every minion of the peaks there are a dozen steppe children growing in the dry Continental heart of all hemispheres still unknown to horticulture.

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Interesting! I am waiting too.

If you walk in a woodland, how many spring flowering species of Trillium can you expect to see? I suppose they have different habitats or do some species overlap in the same spot?

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Toole
Toole's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-07-02

Down here spring is advancing --a number of the early Trilliums are well above the ground and in the loose whorl stage where you can see down the stem through the leaves to gain an idea of whether individual plants have a flowering bud ---however 'one' plant is further on .

First couple of pics are of 'the' plant ----top --followed by side view.

Thinking i had 2 plants close together i scraped away the soil with a view to maybe moving one of them.
However pic 3 shows both stems are coming from the one rhizome.   :o

Pics 4 & 5 ---Individual shots of the respective stems.

A different colour on each stem from the one Trillium plant is something i've never come across before.............

Cheers Dave.

 

 

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Dave, that's so odd, to have two different color flowers with the stems connected to the same rhizome! I wouldn't have believed it had you not shown us the proof.  Has it shown different colors in the past?  I wonder if the flower color might revert or stay the same, in ensuing years.  What species is it?

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Toole
Toole's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-07-02

Hello Mark
Not sure if the plant had a couple of stems last year -- if it had been showing the colours as it is currently, i would have attempted to investigate as i am always moving plants around when in growth, so it will be interesting to see what eventuates next season.

I just had to go and have another look at the rhizome late this afternoon  --the two stems are definitely coming off the plant ,initially enclosed in a sheath before splitting .

Parentage is unknown ---
T.kurabayashii is the earliest to flower here but this one is well ahead of the others .The leaf pattern is similar to some of my cuneatums.
When the petals open fully i will have a peek at the reproductive setup and sepals and take a few meaurements as an aid to it's ID ,although i find it difficult sometimes to be 100% certain as when you grow kurabayashii, angustipetalum and even cuneatum from the USA east coast all together you can end up with all sorts of combinations.

Cheers dave.    

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Toole wrote:

Parentage is unknown ---
T.kurabayashii is the earliest to flower here but this one is well ahead of the others .The leaf pattern is similar to some of my cuneatums.
When the petals open fully i will have a peek at the reproductive setup and sepals and take a few meaurements as an aid to it's ID ,although i find it difficult sometimes to be 100% certain as when you grow kurabayashii, angustipetalum and even cuneatum from the USA east coast all together you can end up with all sorts of combinations.

Cheers dave.    

Hmmm, I don't have first hand experience with any of those three species (kurabayashii, angustipetalum, cuneatum), but did receive seed of T. cuneatum this year.  And as you suggest, there might be hybrids.  Regardless, beautiful leaf patterning, and we'll all want to know how it flowers next year, to see if it is still playing tricks :)

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Toole
Toole's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-07-02

Another early Trillium out today .

A lovely coloured T. angustipetalum  :-* -- the flowers will darken yet.

You can see it has a small deformed 4th petal which in my experience will not appear next season.

Interestingly quite a number of my T.s are 'blind' this year--no doubt still recovering from being weakened by a fungal disease of last year--i sprayed early this month with Octave just as the plants were 'moving' and thankfully there is no sign of any problem. :) :)

However in saying that ,there are still many in bud ,so hopefully i can post more pics during the next week or so.

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

Toole
Toole's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-07-02

Trillium nivale grown in a trough with limestone .

I'm down to a couple of flowering plants ,so have stopped dividing the clump for garden visitors --- there are however a number of seedlings present.

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

As it is starting to feel like fall here, it's great to see signs of spring!

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

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