Trailing Arbutus

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Anonymous
Title: Guest
Trailing Arbutus

The Trailing Arbutus

I wandered lonely where the pine-trees made
Against the bitter East their barricade,
And, guided by its sweet
Perfume, I found, within a narrow dell,
The trailing spring flower tinted like a shell
Amid dry leaves and mosses at my feet.

From under dead boughs, for whose loss the pines
Moaned ceaseless overhead, the blossoming vines
Lifted their glad surprise,
While yet the bluebird smoothed in leafless trees
His feathers ruffled by the chill sea-breeze,
And snow-drifts lingered under April skies.

As, pausing, o'er the lonely flower I bent,
I thought of lives thus lowly, clogged and pent,
Which yet find room,
Through care and cumber, coldness and decay,
To lend a sweetness to the ungenial day
And make the sad earth happier for their bloom.

John Greenleaf Whittier

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Trailing arbutus! Didn't know it was called that - I've been looking for seeds (or plants) of Epigea repens (mayflower)  but never found any ;) It is on my wish list!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lina Hesseling
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-09-18

Lovely poem, James.
I am very fond of poems about gardens, plants and nature.
Thank you for sharing this,

Lina.

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

I agree - it beautifully complements (and compliments) the plant. So many small ericaceous plants are exquisite, and this more than most (though it does seem a long way from arbutus - it's really in a place of its own). Lovely.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Tony Willis
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-01

Hoy wrote:

Trailing arbutus! Didn't know it was called that - I've been looking for seeds (or plants) of Epigea repens (mayflower)  but never found any ;) It is on my wish list!

Have you tried Krystl,I got seed from her and now have a few plants 1cm high,growth has not been rapid.

It is a lovely thing which I hope to see in the wild this coming spring.

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Tony wrote:

Hoy wrote:

Trailing arbutus! Didn't know it was called that - I've been looking for seeds (or plants) of Epigea repens (mayflower)  but never found any ;) It is on my wish list!

Have you tried Krystl,I got seed from her and now have a few plants 1cm high,growth has not been rapid.

It is a lovely thing which I hope to see in the wild this coming spring.

I haven't found it in her catalogue this winter :(  But I will continue to look!

When did you plant the seeds?

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Tony Willis
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-01

I planted them July 2010,they came up rapidly in large numbers and died equally rapidly. I have about six looking as though they will develop into plants as opposed to seedlings. I sowed them on sterilised peat in a closed container to keep out moss spores.

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Tony - I have not seen Kristl's seed list before; there are some very nice things as well as the Epigaea, including one or two pretty obscure umbellifers that I had not come across, and the fascinating shrub Comptonia peregrina, which I saw many years ago at Bristol Botanic Garden and have never seen since. Thank you for mentioning her.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Tim wrote:

Tony - I have not seen Kristl's seed list before; there are some very nice things as well as the Epigaea, including one or two pretty obscure umbellifers that I had not come across, and the fascinating shrub Comptonia peregrina, which I saw many years ago at Bristol Botanic Garden and have never seen since. Thank you for mentioning her.

Tim, Comptonia peregrina (Sweetfern, although not a fern) is very common here, best known for its aromatic foliage and attractive ferny foliage.  It is reported as USDA Zone 2-6, with comments that it does poorly in warmer climates above Zone 6.  There's lots of information out there on this interesting plant.
http://www.hort.uconn.edu/plants/c/comper/comper1.html
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=COPE80

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Tim wrote:

Tony - I have not seen Kristl's seed list before; there are some very nice things as well as the Epigaea, including one or two pretty obscure umbellifers that I had not come across, and the fascinating shrub Comptonia peregrina, which I saw many years ago at Bristol Botanic Garden and have never seen since. Thank you for mentioning her.

Thanks, Tim! I've looked through Kristl's pages several times this winter but not seen Epigaea! But when you said you found it I also found it at once ???
The result: A new order to Kristl ;)

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Tony Willis
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-01

Tim wrote:

Tony - I have not seen Kristl's seed list before; there are some very nice things as well as the Epigaea, including one or two pretty obscure umbellifers that I had not come across, and the fascinating shrub Comptonia peregrina, which I saw many years ago at Bristol Botanic Garden and have never seen since. Thank you for mentioning her.

I foolishly tried her pyrolas' and associated things such as chimaphila to no avail. My optimism new no bounds but I have been unable to germinate them.The E. repens was no problem.

I have just purchased E. gaultheriodes from Cox's having seen the plant many times at RBGE

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