Townsendia pics

32 posts / 0 new
Last post
Nicholls
Title: Guest
Joined: 2009-10-07

Here are a few townsendia pics. All plants have been grown by myself except the T. montana which I photographed on Cartherine Pass, near Snowbird during the NARGS conference there. Anne you remember our hike together to the alpine beach don't you. Iris preferred to to a bit of ironing back at the motel.
The first plant is the cottonball, sown September 2009 and flowered this week for the first time. Wonderful plant. T.condensata is the next one. Many people considered the cottonballs to be the same initially but it's no such thing. T. condensata has always been biennial with me.
T. exscapa is the next one. This was amazing, I was given seed by a friend whilst visiting her in Arizona. The plants had the largest flowers I have ever seen on this species. T. hookeri is the next one. A nice show plant but the thin silver leaves are prone to red spider in hot weather. T. incana is a nice show plant if you get the compact one, it is important to select the right seedlings here. However it is prone to collapse after about three years. T. leptotes a fine show plant but slow to fill a pot. T. mensana. Nice work if you can get it. Occasionally the seed crops up in seed lists (Not exchanges) and is reluctant to germinate well. However as you can see its a nice species. T. montana, as I said photographed during a very good hike to one of Anne Speigels favourite places. T. nuttallii, slow to grow to a large plant but well worth waiting for those nice pink flowers. And finally T. rothrockii an attractive species that has grown well for me in troughs.
There you are Mark a nice collection for you.
Graham

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Thanks Ian/Maggi and Graham, for some fantastic images of Townsendia species and forms; they're such delicious eye-candy.  The ones from the Pryors are sensational, almost imitating South American Chaetanthera species.  Graham, your images let us know these are indeed very growable plants, most worthwhile for a trough, rock garden, or alpine house.  Sorry about your greenhouse devestation, I recall seeing this on SRGC.  Hopefully you have rebuilt since then.

I still hope to do what I set out to do here, that is to do some armchair botanizing, and find and provide links to good images of many Townsendia species, saving hours traversing dead-end, unreliable, or otherwise unhelpful links.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

Hi Graham, I remember the hike to the "alpine beach" very well.  A grand day for beautiful plants  I still have Townsendia montana, which seems quite perennial - seed collected from Sunset Pass on another trip.  I've had the same experience with Townsendia condensata, but it does set a huge amount of seed, much of which germinates even when scattered around the parent plant.  Townsendia hookeri is one of my favorites, beautiful foliage.  I find I can keep the townsendias going longer if they're in a trough as against the open garden, but I'm going to try them in the crevice gardens, new since your New York visit.  If you think about it, a crevice garden is almost like a trough - each crevice is a very finite garden.  I'll let you know how they do.  I've seen Townsendia mensana in Utah - the foliage was spectacular and the seed germinated readily but the plants weren't perennial in my garden.  When you see them on nature. the plants are small, although not as small as Townsendia minima.  Have you ever grown that one?  I always thought it should be ideal in a trough

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

Graham, would you be able to identify this one?  Label lost.

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

"Alpine beach"??  Graham and Anne, you're going to have to explain that one!   ;D   (Rarely are alpine lakes large enough to have the wave action to form what one would think of as a "beach"... so far as I imagine, anyway!?)  I'm having trouble imagining what this might be, and I'm very curious!

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Kelaidis
Kelaidis's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-03

Looks like T. hookeri to my eyes...

For every minion of the peaks there are a dozen steppe children growing in the dry Continental heart of all hemispheres still unknown to horticulture.

Booker
Booker's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-30

Skulski wrote:

"Alpine beach"??  Graham and Anne, you're going to have to explain that one!   ;D   (Rarely are alpine lakes large enough to have the wave action to form what one would think of as a "beach"... so far as I imagine, anyway!?)  I'm having trouble imagining what this might be, and I'm very curious!

Could this be 'loosely' described as an 'alpine beach'?  Pragser Wildsee in the Dolomites and the BEAUTIFUL lake,

Cliff Booker A.K.A. Ranunculus
On the moors in Lancashire, U.K.
Usually wet, often windy, sometimes cold ... and that's just me!

IMYoung
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-31

Spiegel wrote:

Graham, would you be able to identify this one?  Label lost.

I think T. hookeri, Anne.... cute as a button.

Cliff..... your "alpine beach " is magical.... wonderful photo  8) 8)

Ian  and/or Margaret Young ( -here it is usually Margaret)

Aberdeen , North East Scotland, UK
Zone 8a

www.srgc.net

Nicholls
Title: Guest
Joined: 2009-10-07

Looks like T. incana to me Anne.

Graham

Nicholls
Title: Guest
Joined: 2009-10-07

Just to clear up the 'alpine beach' bit here are a few photos taken there when Anne. Joe & myself went hiking before the Snowbird conference. I highly recommend taking the hike as it's so rewarding. From Little Cottonwood Canyon drive up to Albion Basin & Park adjacent to the ski lift. Start hiking up. It climbs around 900' to reach Sunset Peak at 10240'. Here you are confronted by fantastic alpines growing in sand as if on a beach. You can view Catherine Lake from up here as well.
Graham

Pages

Log in or register to post comments