Terrestrial Orchids

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Anonymous
Title: Guest

Hoy wrote:

They ought to start similar projects on some orchids too. Several endangered species have more specimens in university herbaria than in the wild.

Hoy,

Here in the States we have a group of dedicated volunteers that are working to conserve the Federally threatened Eastern Prairie Fringed Orchid, Platanthera leucophaea.  In sites where pollination is not occurring volunteers make sure the job gets done.  Seed is also collected and distributed to new sites.  At least a few new populations have been established.

http://articles.chicagotribune.com/1996-08-04/news/9608040040_1_rare-orc...

Brush clearing is also occurring in areas where lack of light is impacting the orchid.  Although, this is occurring more broadly to reverse the disappearance of prairie/savannah that has been progressing for decades from the impact of fire suppression.

These efforts to remove invasive woody vegetation may have a farther reaching impact.  Grasslands reflect more solar radiation than forests.  The old oak trees store more carbon than smaller diameter brush.  These efforts could potentially help slow Global Warming.

Here's a story about a similar effort in arctic Russia.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/40396941/ns/world_news-world_environment/t/o...

James

   

Tony Willis
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-01

James wrote:

Tony,

     Although I have not read the paper, I am told genetic studies have been done to distinguish at least some of the species.  However, this does not mean these species cannot produce stable hybrids.

James

James I leave the naming to others confident in the knowledge that before long somebody will come up with a new system that will prove all others wrong,until the next one......

Interestingly I have Spiranthes sinensis both pink and giant forms and the reference I consulted says these are synonymous with S. spiralis which is synonymous with S. autumnalis and so it goes on.

Mark I never answered your point on them being able to grow to flower without moisture. They, as do most of the Mediterranean orchids, have an underground tuber which sustains growth until the rain arrives and subsequent root grow starts. Many start root growth before any moisture is present. I keep mine dry in the garage during the summer and they have all started to grow at re-potting in September.

Three of mine flowering now quite out of season.

Orchis morio
Ophrys lutes
Orchis anatolica

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Reflecting on the past season and scanning through digital photos, catching up with some belated images.  Cypripedium reginae is a slow but steady grower here, and has finally started to increase well, almost doubling the number of pips in the last two years.  Didn't get a great photo because it was raining on the weekend when the plant was at peak flowering, but this photo will suffice.  It flowers so late compared to C. parviflorum, at peak in late June, thus a great addition to the woodland garden.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

AmyO
AmyO's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-06

Beautiful c. reginae Mark! I had one a couple years ago that I got at Cady's Falls Nursery here in VT. It flowered survived the following winter, bloomed again even better, then never made it through the next winter! I was so bummed. I'm going to try it again as I'm pretty sure my garden soil should support it with the correct PH and make up.

Amy Olmsted
Hubbardton, VT, Zone 4

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Oh, that's too bad Amy, to have lost such a treasure.  Do you think it was winter cold that did it in, or something else? 

Another nursery I'm looking to purchase from is Hillside Nursery in Shelburne Falls, MA.
Here's a link to their Cypripedium offerings.
http://www.hillsidenursery.biz/orchids/index.php

I'm encouraged by how the Cyps have done here, that I'm willing to shell out $40-$60 each to get a few new cultivars or hybrids in the garden.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

I have tried Cyps thrice and only one plant still survive  :-\ I think it is more than one reason that I haven't succeeded - slugs, climate and maybe soil conditions. But I am inclined to try again! However, not many nurseries sell these here so I have to import and that is not cheap :(

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

AmyO
AmyO's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-06

McDonough wrote:

Oh, that's too bad Amy, to have lost such a treasure.  Do you think it was winter cold that did it in, or something else?  

I'm not sure why it died....I posted a pic of it in bloom here and it was looking really gorgeous and healthy, the following winter was quite snowy so it had good protection. Perhaps it was too wet through spring?

McDonough wrote:

Another nursery I'm looking to purchase from is Hillside Nursery in Shelburne Falls, MA.
Here's a link to their Cypripedium offerings.
http://www.hillsidenursery.biz/orchids/index.php

I bought two Cyps. from Peter at the NARGS AGM in New Hampshire last June and have planted them in a different garden with morning sun instead of afternoon as before.....so we'll see. I followed the Cady's Falls planting directions.

Amy Olmsted
Hubbardton, VT, Zone 4

Tony Willis
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-01

a tiny terrestrial flowering for me now.

It has very nice leaves.

Hemipilia sp.

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Tony wrote:

a tiny terrestrial flowering for me now.

It has very nice leaves.

Hemipilia sp.

I would say the leaves are the nicest!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Tingley
Title: Member
Joined: 2013-01-07

I am late to this thread on terrestrial orchids. Regarding Cypripedium acaule, I believe that Fraser's Thimble Farm Nursery in BC has been successful getting plants growing artificially- see http://www.thimblefarms.com/cypripedium.html

Last year I moved my Cyp reginae to a better location. Hopefully being close to a pond will give it an extra boost this year. It will have a few really nice companions as well- Platanthera lacera, Platanthera psycodes (or Platanthera grandiflora), and Lysichiton camtschatcensis along with a few seedling Japanese iris. If all goes well, I ought to be able to take a few photos to share with the group.

Southwest Nova Scotia, zone 6b or thereabouts

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