Telesonix jamesii

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Kelaidis
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Telesonix jamesii

I realize it's not strictly speaking Saxifraga, but I'm sure that neither Reginald Farrer nor Malcolm would object to treating it in this section...Telesonix jamesii is one of our supreme endemic Colorado plants (I know, I know, there is a Telesonix called jamesii that occurs in the Middle Rockies of Wyoming and Montana that pretends to be this same thing: that miserable creature is Telesonix heucheriformis: Those of us who have seen and know both know they are different creatures, and our Colorado species is far superior)...

I couldn't resist posting two pictures showing them blooming last year: this is supposed to be a very fussy little thing that doesn't bloom well in cultivation. That may be true in open soil, but it loves troughs...It's been in this trough for some time now. I will be anxious to see how it blooms this coming year.

Hoy
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Joined: 2009-12-15

Kelaidis,
Is this specie easy from seed? I have actually been looking for a chance to get it in my garden. Can't remember coming across neither seeds nor plants for sale. Do you think it tolerates wet climate?

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Kelaidis
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Telesonix is no harder to grow from seed than any Saxifrage. It does produce abundant seed in nature and the garden. The one thing to remember is that it is NOT evergreen: the foliage dies off by midwinter. So it might look dead to some eyes.

I have seen it growing well in England and the best plant I have ever seen was near Goteburg in Sweden, so I do think it tolerates wetter winters. I would plant it in a crevice or trough however, even in Norway.

PK

For every minion of the peaks there are a dozen steppe children growing in the dry Continental heart of all hemispheres still unknown to horticulture.

Boland
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We have grown that for years in the alpine house at work.  I am going to plant a piece outside this spring to see how it does outdoors.  It is certainly a charming plant.

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

Kelaidis
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Todd! I hate you, as Wayne Roderick would say! What a magnificent specimen (can't believe I posted my paltry clumps..you were just waiting!...)  Grrrrrr.

For every minion of the peaks there are a dozen steppe children growing in the dry Continental heart of all hemispheres still unknown to horticulture.

Hoy
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Joined: 2009-12-15

Kelaidis, It is not always the size that counts!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Kelaidis
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Joined: 2010-02-03

A point well taken....
                ....I was refering to the Telesonix (to clarify things.)

For every minion of the peaks there are a dozen steppe children growing in the dry Continental heart of all hemispheres still unknown to horticulture.

Boland
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Joined: 2009-09-25

Panayoti, I'm sure you make up for your lack of (Telesonix) size in oh so many other ways!  LOL!

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

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