Sweet-flowered Androsace (Androsace chamaejasme)

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Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27
Sweet-flowered Androsace (Androsace chamaejasme)

Androsace chamaejasme is another plant with circumpolar distribution, and ranging into Eurasia. It's common here in the upper montane and alpine zones and does well in the rock garden or trough, too.
The common names - sweet-flowered androsace, rockjasmine - hint at another of its attributes... although it does take some hunkering-down to appreciate its pleasant perfume.

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Skulski wrote:

Androsace chamaejasme is another plant with circumpolar distribution, and ranging into Eurasia.  It's common here in the upper montane and alpine zones and does well in the rock garden or trough, too.  
The common names - sweet-flowered androsace, rockjasmine - hint at another of its attributes... although it does take some hunkering-down to appreciate its pleasant perfume.  

Lori, I love the last photo, like a marmot, poking their heads up above the rocks.  I haven't grown this fine plant but hope to one day.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Indeed a charmer.  What do you suppose is the pH of that tarn rock (am I using the term correctly?).

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

I couldn't tell you the actual pH that groundwater in contact with the rock would have, but I would expect it to be pretty basic, as the rock in the photos is limestone, and limestone is exposed at surface over vast areas here. It's either the Palliser or Banff Formation (ouch, I feel I should know this... must get myself a map) which are both very thick and thus form extensive outcrops. The front ranges of the Rockies in Alberta are, in fact, predominantly limestone.   (The garden photo, however, shows what I jokingly refer to as my crevice garden, in which the rocks are siliceous siltstone, i.e. not calcareous.)  
A tarn is a glacially-carved lake, i.e. a lake in a cirque, often filled by snowmelt.   :)

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

"Tarn" is the same word as Norwegian "tjern, tjoern"! Meaning small lake.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

I don't believe the plant is sensitive to pH, particularly, although that is something perhaps others could comment on.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Sellars
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-29

Lori:

Your garden plant looks terrific.  I have tried Androsace chamaejasme and failed. Maybe I should try again. :-\

David Sellars
From the Wet Coast of British Columbia, Canada

Feature your favourite hikes at:
www.mountainflora.ca
MountainFlora videos:
http://www.youtube.com/user/MountainFlora

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Thank you!  I'll definitely try to collect seed... although, in last year's photos, I did not notice signs of pollination - no colour change in the flower eye - assuming that is reliable... ?

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Boland
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

Use a small brush to 'pretend' you are a bee! 
I tried this species too with no luck but then I generally don't do well with Androsace except for primuloides and sempervivoides.

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

A few more photos of a lovely species, in the wild:
         

And in the garden - in bloom and showing its typically brilliant fall colour:
 

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Very lovely indeed, Lori!

I have grown it on a few occasions but it is always shortlived with me :(

Some very nice rocks too, especially in the first picture! Do I spot a piece of conglomerate in between the lichen covered rocks of quarts (near the edge)?

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

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