Stenotus acaulis

12 posts / 0 new
Last post
Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04
Stenotus acaulis

Stenotus acaulis (syn. Haplopappus acaulis)is a very nice dwarf aster from the Western states (CA,NV,OR,WA,ID,MT,WY,CO,and AZ). It's range starts at the Eastern Sierra Nevada Range traveling eastward across the Great Basin Wasache and Uinta ranges. Then crossing the Middle Rockies and into the Wyoming Basin. Within this vast range there is a lot of variability and integration among regionally distinct populations.

This little mat forming desert and alpine daisy, forms condensed 2"(2cm) tall mats of upward pointing lance shaped leaves, that dry through the summer and become very prickly to the touch. The yellow spring flowers are held above the mats from 1"-4" (2.5-10cm). In the populations of the Eastern Great Basin you can see plants with wider full petals blooming along side plants with strap like petals. Both forms equally charming.
It is not uncommon to see wild mats with portions dead and the remainder flourishing. As the mats expand their new rosettes send down, their own sets of new wiry tap roots. This makes it fairly easy to separate new cuttings.

http://www.calflora.org/cgi-bin/species_query.cgi?where-calrecnum=7784
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=STAC
http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=1&taxon_id=220012965

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

John, that one is one of the prettiest Asteraceaes I have seen ever! You say it is easy from cuttings - how is it from seed?

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

I find it easy from seed. Grow it on a sand bed in your climate!! ;)

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

You'd probably want to make it a very substantial and raised sand bed, with all the rain in your climate, Trond!  :o

Looks like a terrific rock garden plant.  Your first photo, which I assume is an example of the wide-petalled form, is especially spectacular. 

I had to look up the genus Stenotus, having not even heard of it before.  Wow, the former "Haplopappus" species have sure been scattered to the winds.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Weiser wrote:

I find it easy from seed. Grow it on a sand bed in your climate!! ;)

John, that is no problem ;)

Lori wrote:

You'd probably want to make it a very substantial and raised sand bed, with all the rain in your climate, Trond!  :o

Lori, at home it had been necessary with an umbrella too!
I had some nice Leontopodiums started from seed last year but those I planted at home are a complete mess by now although I've had almost no freezing temps so far. However I planted some t my mountain cabin and some at my summerhouse too. Hope they fare better!
If I get Stenotus acaulis I think I'll plant them at my summerhouse - in a raised sandbed ;)

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

John - those are really great pictures to go with your Erigeron bloomeri. The prospect of a much bigger sand bed looms more and more! I may have to redesign parts of the garden. I still toy with the idea of a year round covered bed for some of these plants, because our summers can be so variable, but maybe a sand bed on a sufficient scale would obviate the need for this.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Boland
Boland's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

I have one seedling going through its first winter outdoors......generally western NA alpines do not make it in my wet climate but I did invert a pot over the plant to keep the crown dry, so we will see (I do that with many westerners with mixed results...certainly helps rather than hinders!)

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Weiser wrote:

Stenotus acaulis (syn. Haplopappus acaulis)is a very nice dwarf aster from the Western states. It's range starts at the Eastern Sierra Nevada range traveling eastward across the Great Basin, Wasache and Uinta ranges. Then crossing the Middle Rockies and into the Wyoming Basin. Within this vast range there is a lot of variability and integration among regionally distinct populations.

This little mat forming desert and alpine daisy, forms condensed 2"(2cm) tall mats of upward pointing lance shaped leaves, that dry through the summer and become very prickly to the touch. The yellow spring flowers are held above the mats from 1"-4" (2.5-10cm). In the populations of the Eastern Great Basin you can see plants with wider full petals blooming along side plants with strap like petals. Both forms equally charming.
It is not uncommon to see wild mats with portions dead and the remainder flourishing. As the mats expand their new rosettes send down, their own sets of new wiry tap roots. This makes it fairly easy to separate new cuttings.

http://www.calflora.org/cgi-bin/species_query.cgi?where-calrecnum=7784
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=STAC
http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=1&taxon_id=220012965

Lovely, John! I think Alplains has this under some name or other..

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

Alplains has it listed as Haplopappus acaulis. They list several regional varieties form the Rocky Mountain area.

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

Brian_W
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-04-28

Greetings,

Nice set of photos and great information.  I find this species growing abundantly in the Pryor mountains where it forms solid soccer ball sized cushions.  The really old specimens often have eroded bases revealing a stout twisted tap root. 

Brian

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

John, wonderful pictures of the stenotus (haplopappus).  I can't keep up with all the name changes.  I've admired this plant often in the wild, but have had great difficulty in getting it to last in my garden.  I've tried it in raised and sloped scree, raised sand beds and still no success.  Hymenoxys acaulis, on the other hand, lasts for years and flowers wonderfully.  I must be doing something wrong, but haven't figured it out yet.  Any ideas?

Pages

Log in or register to post comments