Some Prairie Wildflowers

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cohan
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Joined: 2011-02-03

Stephen, good news on the Rubus! I was worried about them, knowing some Rubus are hard to germinate, and the amount of seed was small..

Trond, here is a view of (wild) Maianthemum stellatum in a damp shady location.. in the sun, they look exactly like those Lori has shown... I'd like to try moving some pieces from one location the other, and/or growing them side by side to see if all the difference is from habitat or not, they are so different!
Flowers not open, but they look typical...
No bifolium here, M trifolium should be flowering in wet wooded areas (haven't been out there) and M canadense are just about to start flowering here.. super common, they are all over my 'lawn' hate to mow them, and will go around nice patches, but can't leave them in as many places as they are (the grass and poplar shoots etc will grow too much!)

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Stephenb wrote:

Good to hear that the Maianthemum stellatum is easily controlled - mine is in flower now and has spread quickly and I was getting a bit worried...

Well, mine are currently in an area where they were the groundcover under a saskatoonberry - now removed (as it was overly shaded and very prone to rust)... In that area, I only controlled them to keep them out of the path.  The stolons are a few inches below the surface  (but not down to China, at least!) and strong enough that they can be pulled/dug out relatively easily, so as far as invasive things go, it is not the worst!  I'd prefer it stayed in its own spot though!  ;)  Depending on what becomes of that area, I'm not sure I'll keep it. 

I dunno... I'm not seeing great differences in the appearance of Maianthemum (Smilacena) stellatum from sun to shade here (other than a bit of difference in "tightness" of the foliage along the stem and how upright the plant is), or even as compared to your photo, Cohan... ?  What are you seeing as the big difference?

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

cohan
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Joined: 2011-02-03

The foliage looks very different to me, Lori-- the plant in shade is taller (haven't measured but a wild guess--a difference of maybe 40cm compared to 30 if not more ), foliage on the shade plant is very open, leaves spaced out, flat, dark green, and plant arches overall; the plants in sun are shorter, very densely leafed with no spaces, leaves are very glaucous and folded upwards on each side of the mid vein, overall a stiff, erect plant compared to a soft droopy one...

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Okay, so we are seeing the same differences (but just describing the magnitude differently  ;D)... just wondered what I was missing.  Thanks!

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

cohan
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Lol..all about perspective, I suppose ;) (or lack thereof?)
I think the thing for me is that I was used to the shade form, growing up, since that occurs on the farm, and I was not wandering around roadsides in the area in those days (except very close by) so I was completely unfamiliar with the sunny form and it looked like a different plant altogether (as soon as I looked it up I knew, of course; most images around in fact are of the sunny form).. Whereas, if you always knew both as the same species, you'd just think of them that way...

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

A few others...
Seneca snakeroot, Polygala senega with flowers not quite opened - a new one for me:
   

I found one Penstemon nitidus in that area, and a few Eriogonum flavum:
 

More Hedysarum boreale:
 

Views, with a large buffaloberry (Shepherdia canadensis) in first photo:
 

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

This looked interesting... I think it's bracted bog orchid, Coeloglossum viride - must check back in a few days:

There are colourful tracts of astragalus and oxytropis all over now...
Oxytropis viscida; the close-up shows the minute yellowish glands that make it sticky:
 

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Very interesting--we just don't have these plant communities, even in open areas in ditches etc; I really need to try this year to find some interesting prairie plant communities without going super far, I do want to try the Battle River area...
I did find the Polygala last year in some local roadsides, it was new to me, too, but none of those bright peas (Oxy monticola, which is lovely, but not bright, and some I haven't id'd, maybe Astrag with inconspicuous flrs, then the tall Hedys and Astrag).. I'd be thrilled if I ran into an Eriogonum around here...lol, I've only seen it in Drumheller area.. Neat to see the H boreale in grass, since I only know it from foothills/mountains, and its been in barer places...
If you happen to pass through there at the right time for seed of any of  the Erio, Hedysarum b and the Oxytropis viscida, I'd be very interested!

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

I am hooked, Lori! I have a soft spot for any pea plant. Both Oxytropis viscida and Hedysarum boreale are beautiful!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Today in the park... I think these are all colour variations of Oxytropis viscida... (If they are not, please tell me!)
             

Heres's an update on the single bracted bog orchid (Coeloglossum viride) I saw - not too showy, which I expect is the only way an orchid can survive in a popular park!

Heart-leaved alexander, Zizia aptera:

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

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