Some Prairie Wildflowers

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Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27
Some Prairie Wildflowers

A few pretty things I saw on my way home this evening through the park...

It looks like there will be a good berry crop along the river uplands... saskatoonberry, Amelanchier alnifolia:

The gold of buffalobean (Thermopsis rhombifolia) has taken center stage from Pulsatilla patens, though the purple seedheads of the latter remain very showy:

Allium textile is starting to bloom:

Musineon divaricata was an interesting find.... (I must get off the bike and look around more often! :) )

Lithospermum incisum, smaller than in my garden (where they are not giants by any means):

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

A tiny Antennaria (with my gloved finger for scale); Geum triflorum; Buffaloberry, Shepherdia canadensis:
     

Morel; star-flowered solomon's seal, Maianthemum stellatum; mouse-eared chickweed, Cerastium arvense:
     

Oxytropis sericeus:
   

Bastard toadflax, Comandra umbellata:

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Another very interesting find (sorry for the poor photos)... Cymopterus acaulis:
 

Geranium viscosissimum:

And the brilliant fuchsia (the colour, not the plant, Trond  ;)) of Hedysarum boreale:
 

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

A nice peek into your native lowland flora, Lori.  Miainthemum is strictly a forest plant here. 

I once bought Thermopsis rhombifolia.  It almost immediately died upon transplanting into the garden, or so I though.  The following year it resurfaced in 3 separate places, one to two feet from the original place of planting (which, by the way, still showed no life).  That was enough of an omen for me, and it was eradicated.  Anyone else have this problem in their garden, and is the plant normally stoloniferous in the wild?

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Barstow
Barstow's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-08-27

Great pictures as usual, Lori!!  I'm a bit confused here Hedysarum in flower at the same time as Amelanchier? The Hedysarums I grow are late summer flowerers here. Is boreale much earlier? I've tried this one several times, but for some reason it never gets through the winters here.

If you ever see seed on the Cymopterus or Allium textile (it's never been correct the times I've tried it) I would love to swap, beg, beg...!!

Another question, I germinated one of the Shepherdias and it grows incredibly slowly - still less than 10 cm after 3 years. Do they have special requirements?

S.

Stephen Barstow
Malvik, Norway
63.4N
Age: Lower end of the 20-25,000 day range

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

As an umbel nut it is nice to see the Musineon and Cymopterus. That mass of Pulsatilla patens must be glorious in flower - I always think of them as special individual plants in the garden, though in some favoured gardens I have seen Pulsatillas seeding generously. It is particularly nice to see the Lithospermum as I have been trying to grow it not very successfully. Quite a number of other choice borages have done well in the sand bed, but this has lingered and probably needs more robust soil.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

RickR wrote:

A nice peek into your native lowland flora, Lori.  Miainthemum is strictly a forest plant here. 

I once bought Thermopsis rhombifolia.  It almost immediately died upon transplanting into the garden, or so I though.  The following year it resurfaced in 3 separate places, one to two feet from the original place of planting (which, by the way, still showed no life).  That was enough of an omen for me, and it was eradicated.  Anyone else have this problem in their garden, and is the plant normally stoloniferous in the wild?

Maianthemum stellatum grows both in the open grasslands and in the forest here, and as it is stoloniferous, tends to form big colonies.  (I have it in the garden - it may have come in in the soil of a saskatoonberry bush? - the stolons are fairly easy to pull out to control it.  Yes, Thermopsis rhombifolia does spread around and is probably not for the very well-tended garden either!

Stephenb wrote:

I'm a bit confused here Hedysarum in flower at the same time as Amelanchier? The Hedysarums I grow are late summer flowerers here. Is boreale much earlier? I've tried this one several times, but for some reason it never gets through the winters here.

If you ever see seed on the Cymopterus or Allium textile (it's never been correct the times I've tried it) I would love to swap, beg, beg...!!

Another question, I germinated one of the Shepherdias and it grows incredibly slowly - still less than 10 cm after 3 years. Do they have special requirements?

Yes, Hedysarum boreale is early blooming, while H. alpinum and H. sulphurescens are much later.  Allium textile is common and it should not be too hard to find seeds... I've never even noticed Cymopterus before! 
Well, I find it hard to guess what Sheperdia might prefer... they are common prairie and forest edge shrubs, growing in horrible alkaline clay soil with little water and harsh conditions... ?  We have one in the front yard that I would have to say has also been very slow growing, so perhaps that's just their nature?

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Tim wrote:

That mass of Pulsatilla patens must be glorious in flower...

Here they were in bloom, Tim:
http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?topic=67.msg8443#msg8443

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Interesting to see some familiar plants, and some I have to travel to see, or not at all (the umbellifers are very interesting)! Amelanchier rarely grows in fully exposed spots here, though it is very very common in open woods and edges of woods.. Ditto for Shepherdia canadensis--probably hard to find more than a square metre without it on my acreage (apart from mowed areas, and even then there could be seedlings).. it can be seen in exposed roadsides, but much more common in open woods--or even quite shady spots, but I suspect the woods sometimes fill in around them.... I have no idea how fast they grow, since they are all wild plants.. I could certainly give you some more seed (canadensis) to try, Stephen.... they grow in wet, dry, sunny and shady places here.. I don't know how acidic or not our soil is, though, for example, every inch of snow in winter is covered in spruce needles after a wind....most plants that grow here will grow in any soil from clayey loam to spruce duff to leaf litter on concrete, even my woodash pile....lol...

We were just in the mountains on Tues, and Hedysarum boreale were just emerging around Abraham Lake, no flowers, but shockingly, a few blooms were seen just below treeline at the Columbia Icefield-- feels like a different subspecies up there, haven't read up on it.. Oxytropis sericea was flowering around Abraham Lake (montane zone), though not as far along as yours..

Rick, here too Maianthemum stellatum grows in the open and in shaded spots--looking so different you'd never know it was the same plant! Forms much larger denser stands of smaller more glaucous plants in the open... remind me to show comparative photos, sometime...
No Thermopsis here, unfortunately...

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Barstow
Barstow's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-08-27

Yes, please to the Shepherdia, Cohan (the various Rubus spp you sent are now germinating, but still no Osmorhiza)!

Good to hear that the Maianthemum stellatum is easily controlled - mine is in flower now and has spread quickly and I was getting a bit worried...

Stephen Barstow
Malvik, Norway
63.4N
Age: Lower end of the 20-25,000 day range

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Skulski wrote:

Another very interesting find (sorry for the poor photos)... Cymopterus acaulis:

Geranium viscosissimum:

And the brilliant fuchsia (the colour, not the plant, Trond  ;)) of Hedysarum boreale:

Well, Lori, I have learnt much of these pages! You can never be sure if a plantname means the plant or the colour in English ;D

Very intereating to see the flora of the prairie, Lori. Most of which is unfamiliar :o
However I do grow Maianthemum stellatum but it is different from the one you show, Lori. (If you find seed later???  ;))

I have tried Thermopsis too but it didn't survive. Not sure it was this species though. Here it could roam free :o

Maianthemum bifolium
is everywhere in Norway.It is one of the commonest plants I think.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

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