Signs of life

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Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

I have a clump of G. 'Flore Pleno' myself but I have to admit that I like the ordinary form better! I have 8-10 different selections of Galanthus I think. I am very excited by the thought of how far the spring has come when I finally arrive home (only one week away but still...). That's the worst - and best - by travelling!
Pulmonaria and Corydalis I have in swarms. They self-sow but not true to type! Corydalis nobilis is short lived here but I know it is very popular and easy in the northern part of Norway.
I try to gather a population of Jeffersonia in my woodland but have had limited success, not that easy from seed?
And Eranthis! Have tried many times but something nasty eat all the plants and the seedlings every time!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

More signs of life...
1) Adonis amurensis 'Fukujukai'
2) Balsamorhiza hookeri var. lagocephala
3) Besseya alpina from seed last year, emerging.
4) Corydalis nobilis, going into action here too.
5) Corydalis magadanica, still tiny, from a planting in 2008.
6) Pulmonaria altaica
7) Dracocephalum palmatum - actually, this one is evergreen, and always winters over very well.  Perhaps it will finally bloom this year!  (I grew some of these from seed a few years ago.)

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Boland
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

My signs of life:  Pulmonaria angustifolia, Pulmonaria montana, Saxifraga 'Marianne', Viburnum X bodnantense

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

Boland
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

Omphaloides verna and Corydalis solida

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

I have to agree, the double forms of galanthus are a little weird, but this clone is a most reliable bloomer. 

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Wow, you are way ahead of us now, Todd!

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

I love this thread! There is nothing as tantalizing as the shape, color and form of new shoots emerging.  Lori, tell me more about Pulmonaria altaica.  Last year, at a late summer NARGS plant sale I bought 6 plants of Corydalis magadanica, which flowered even as young plants with yellow and brown marked flowers, none are up and all look dead >:(

A few items that caught my attention today:

1.  Dicentra cucullaria surging out of the ground, have these beauties everywhere.
2.  Paeonia wittmanniana leaf buds - taken in low late afternoon light.  Love the look of these muscular buds.
3.  Paeonia wittmanniana leaf buds - taken in brigh morning light, red and lively.
4.  A very tiny Viola species with pointed (not rounded) variegated leaves.. V. selkirkii?

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Things don't evolve fast here even without freezing temperatures. Been away for a week and the snowdrops and many crocuses are finito but new plants slowly emerge. It is still early morning and I have not taken many pictures yet! Here are two:
I like cardamines and one of the first to bloom is C. enneaphylla.
The other is my only palm, still alive seemingly after a harsh winter.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Mark, Pulmonaria altaica is an introduction from Siberia by Josef Halda, according to Wrightman's, source of my plant in 2008:  
http://www.wrightmanalpines.com/details.asp?PRODUCT_ID=P077

It is quite lovely - the leaves are finely felted and soft as a black lab's ears, and the flowers are quite large:

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

I have several pulmonarias but not altaica. Nice color.
Here are some more plants from the deep woods.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

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