Serviceable Milkvetch

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Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

Kelaidis wrote:

Ann: you are right! I grew this years ago and it did last for years at the Gardens. I must get it back!

Great to see you on the Forum!

OK Panayoti.  You know where to come and get some.  It's been too long since you've been East.
The other wonderful pea is Astragalus spatulatus.  It's lasted here for years in a trough, it was a casualty in the open garden.  This one is quite pale, almost white with a blush of pink.  I think with age it has become paler.  I seem to recall it was pinker when younger.  Should I be adding something to the mix in the trough?

Kelaidis
Kelaidis's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-03

Looks just like an albino to me: I have seen albinos in nature very rarely. I would treasure it!

I don't grow any spatulatus right now: drats. You inspire me to try again!

For every minion of the peaks there are a dozen steppe children growing in the dry Continental heart of all hemispheres still unknown to horticulture.

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

Here's another one that is really nice, Astragalus zionis.  It's been here 4 years and this year it made two seed pods.  The pods are turning red now - they're large, almost like the pods of Astragalus crassicarpus.  The flowers are getting better each year, quite showy.  I grow it here in a lean scree.

Kelaidis
Kelaidis's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-03

This is a new one for me: very graceful bearing. I'm amazed you do so well with these.

There are only a few Astragalus I grow long term: Astragalus angustifolius is my only Methusalah. It's  blooming right now.

For every minion of the peaks there are a dozen steppe children growing in the dry Continental heart of all hemispheres still unknown to horticulture.

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

Astragalus angustifolius is the one I've never been able to grow even short term.  Everyone else seems to have good luck with it. My all-time favorite is Astragalus lutosus but it got carried away by our truly awful winter this year with 60 in January for days and then crashing down with a wet period.

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Spiegel wrote:

Astragalus angustifolius is the one I've never been able to grow even short term.  Everyone else seems to have good luck with it. My all-time favorite is Astragalus lutosus but it got carried away by our truly awful winter this year with 60 in January for days and then crashing down with a wet period.

Anne, is the photo showing A. lutosus?  If so, the foliage is stunning... certainly worth trying again and hoping for more amenable (and normal) winter conditions.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

A. lutosus is spectacular - what an amazing foliage effect!

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Kelaidis
Kelaidis's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-03

A. lutosus just shot to the top of my wish list...

You have GOT to be able to grow A. angustifolius, Ann. It grows everywhere for me, and is in full bloom as we speak. It is tough as nails. The one Astragalus that comes easily from cuttings...and lives forever. Mine were half smothered by Verbascum last year and again this year: I finally banished the mulleins from anywhere near them. They have bounced back beautifully despite being choked out and crowded  (something other astragalus would not tolerate)...

For every minion of the peaks there are a dozen steppe children growing in the dry Continental heart of all hemispheres still unknown to horticulture.

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

Mark, my photo is of Astragalus lutosus.The foliage is spectacular, I think. Each leaf appears to be outlined in silver - what's really happening is that the edges of each leaf curl up slightly so what you are seeing is the intensely silver hairs on the bottom.
It apparently grows in very inhospitable places but can be grown in the garden, needing full sun and perfect drainage.  This horrible winter we had just carried off the last several plants.  It never made seed pods for me although it flowered so well.  It is simply a beautiful plant. Alan Bradshaw of Alplains carries seed of this. He said that in nature it rambles a bit which is just what my older plants were doing.  When young it's quite tight.  Another beauty is Astragalus loanus but very difficult for me to grow and hard to find seed.

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

Kelaidis wrote:

A. lutosus just shot to the top of my wish list...

You have GOT to be able to grow A. angustifolius, Ann. It grows everywhere for me, and is in full bloom as we speak. It is tough as nails. The one Astragalus that comes easily from cuttings...and lives forever. Mine were half smothered by Verbascum last year and again this year: I finally banished the mulleins from anywhere near them. They have bounced back beautifully despite being choked out and crowded  (something other astragalus would not tolerate)...

You've convinced me to try again. I seem to be surrounded by people in the northeast who have no difficulty with this one

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