Serviceable Milkvetch

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Kelaidis
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Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-03
Serviceable Milkvetch

Over the decades I'm sure I have grown several dozen milkvetches in my various gardens. As gorgeous as many of the American species are, I have noticed that the Eurasian ones are more apt to stick around. This Turkish species came to me from Jim and Jenny Archibald over 20 years ago. I can't remember if it is Astragalus alyssoides or A. alyssifolia (it was one of the two)...It certainly doesn't look like any alyssum I grow! My original plants grew for almost a decade at my last home. I grew some from seed when I moved to Quince and they are still with me ten years later. I must remember to collect a few more seeds or try some cuttings: it's a sweet little plant!

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

This one is from Turkey too - in situ about 3600m! I think it is Astragalus, but don't know the species.
Haven't tried it my garden.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Might it be Astragalus angustifolius, Trond?
This supposed specimen of Astragalus angustifolius, grown in captivity and in regular soil (and even in less direct sun than it might prefer), is not so alpine in character.  (Apologies for the fuzzy picture.)

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Kelaidis wrote:

Over the decades I'm sure I have grown several dozen milkvetches in my various gardens. As gorgeous as many of the American species are, I have noticed that the Eurasian ones are more apt to stick around. This Turkish species came to me from Jim and Jenny Archibald over 20 years ago. I can't remember if it is Astragalus alyssoides or A. alyssifolia (it was one of the two)...It certainly doesn't look like any alyssum I grow! My original plants grew for almost a decade at my last home. I grew some from seed when I moved to Quince and they are still with me ten years later. I must remember to collect a few more seeds or try some cuttings: it's a sweet little plant!

Nice Astrag!  I couldn't find either name in IPNI (sometimes they miss names), but did find Astragalus alyssoides in parts of C. Asia, including Turkey.  The following link has some photos from the online Van Flora in Turkey.  With "alyssifolia", I think you have Phlox in your thoughts  :D
http://vanherbaryum.yyu.edu.tr/flora/famgenustur/fab/astragalus/aly/inde...

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Skulski wrote:

Might it be Astragalus angustifolius, Trond?
This supposed specimen of Astragalus angustifolius, grown in captivity and in regular soil (and even in less direct sun than it might prefer), is not so alpine in character.  (Apologies for the fuzzy picture.)

I thought it might be angustifolius but according to a Turkish flora I have (not good) it is at least one or two other candidates.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

What are the other candidates, Trond?

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Trond, are you using the Turkish flora TÜBİVES database (Turkish Plants Data Service)? It's an excellent resource that I've become aware of recently.  Lori, as a "researcher" you'll like this one too. Here's the link: 
http://turkherb.ibu.edu.tr/index.php?sayfa=200

If you know where a plant was collected or found in Turkey, you can click on the interactive map of Vilayets (provinces) and it gives you a complete listing of taxa, sorted by family and genus, found in that province.  Or, you can use a Grid system to search.  Or search by a keyword, such as Astragalus... wow, 447 accepted astragali in Turkey!  If based on plant characteristics, such as in your white astragalus example, you can narrow it down to some likely ID candidates, you can use the "Taxa Comparison" option.  So, you can click on "taxa Comparison", select Fabaceae > List Taxa > find Astragalus from the genus list, then check the boxes of species you want to compare.  I did this with the four A. angustifolius subspecies and varieties, and uploaded a screen capture.  Very cool. 

Notes: 
alttür= subspecies
varyete = variety

Some plant taxa that have widespread distribution in Turkey might not be recorded yet on a province level, thus might be missing from the taxa listing by Vilayets, so this thing is still a work in progress. 

The other option for Turkish Flora, is to use the Van Flora web site.  You'll find a listing of genera and species, with photos and herbarium specimens for some taxa, but unfortunately not for all.  Here's the link for Astragalus... maybe 15-20% have detail information links with photos.
http://vanherbaryum.yyu.edu.tr/flora/famgenustur/astragalus.htm

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Thank you for that link, Mark - I will bookmark it.  Turkey has such a rich flora!

Here's an interesting one - Astragalus gilviflorus.  It occurs through SE Alberta.  I was not successful at growing it in the front yard years ago (despite it being a plant of the dry prairies), but it has survived in a trough.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Skulski wrote:

What are the other candidates, Trond?

Hello, back in business! Been offline for a week, enervating!

I thought of A barbatus as a likely candidate.  A ermineus and hirticalyx are also found in the same area, but they are a little different, maybe.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

Panayoti,
I think you might like to add  another arrow to your quiver of astragali that perform well in the garden:  Astragalus monspessulans.
It handles the northeastern assault of humidity, unexpected days of heavy rain and periods of drought.  It's a reliable bloomer and seems to be able to handle any amount of cold.  I grow it in sand beds and in screes.  It makes seedlings which can be dug up when they're quite small and easily transplanted directly into the garden. The flowers are the color of red wine and the canoe shaped pods also turn red. I'll try and hunt up a photo.

Kelaidis
Kelaidis's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-03

Ann: you are right! I grew this years ago and it did last for years at the Gardens. I must get it back!

Great to see you on the Forum!

For every minion of the peaks there are a dozen steppe children growing in the dry Continental heart of all hemispheres still unknown to horticulture.

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