Senescent with dignity!

24 posts / 0 new
Last post
Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Skulski wrote:

 
Wow, I envy your Himalayan cedar!

I like the way the flowers age on Persicaria polymorpha - the colour reminds me a bit of dock (Rumex):

Are you sure you envy my cedar? It gets even bigger than the Persicaria!
If it is not invasive, maybe I should try some day. Then it can compete with the other giants here.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

I also grew Persicaria polymorpha, and liked it very much.  It was not invasive, but just grew to large for where it was growing.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

I really like plants that "go over" in style.  I already have a topic on Scutellaria incana, I'm but posting a couple updated photos here. This year the plant had a dozen or more multibranched stems which were fantastic in flower,
(see http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?topic=88.0)
but in the seed stage, it is equally as attractive, love those pinkish-red seed "boxes".

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

I have some scutellarias but they never stay with such a pride!

This Aralia species from Himalaya (Chadwell seeds)  displays the berries and the thrushes find them as soon as the berries get ripe.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Hoy wrote:

I have some scutellarias but they never stay with such a pride!

This Aralia species from Himalaya (Chadwell seeds)  displays the berries and the thrushes find them as soon as the berries get ripe.

Wow Trond, that's an awesome Aralia!!!  I love how the fruits are arranged, and their color is pleasing too.  So, it's a "sp" and not identified yet?  Way back when I used to subscribe to Chadwell seed shares, but embarrassed to admit I succeeded with very few in the long run.  How large growing is your Aralia?

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

The species had not been identified when I got the seeds. Now I have (as usual) not any labels so I have no collection number either. The plants (I have two - the other is lighter in color) grow to about 4ft. They clump up slowly.

Here's the other one. You can see almost all the plant.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

I guess I don't have a bird "problem" with Aralia continentalis (or A. cordata).

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

RickR wrote:

I guess I don't have a bird "problem" with Aralia continentalis (or A. cordata).

I guess I've been missing out by not growing any of these Aralia, cool plants, lots of colorful berries.  Rick, that's quite a berry bounty on your Aralia, a sultry color scheme, I like it.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

RickR wrote:

I guess I don't have a bird "problem" with Aralia continentalis (or A. cordata).

No you have not! The blackbird is the worst. They also dig in my rock garden picking stones and plants and tossing them all over the place. The last days I have been visited by the Bohemian Waxwing  (Bombycilla garrulus) too. They are greadyguts.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

We have the Cedar waxwing here (Bombycilla cedrorum).  I think their favorite fruit of all is from the Amelanchier spp. (Juneberries, Service berries Indian plums or Saskatoons).  Greedyguts is a perfect name for them.  After a few days of them eating in my Amelanchier 'Autumn Brilliance' tree, I swear they have gotten fat.

Mark, mine and Trond's aralias are herbaceous.  A. continentalis has dull colored berries, and A. cordata var. sachalinensis has shiny berries.  (And I assume the entire species cordata, but I have only grown this variety.)  I think all the  hardy woody aralias for the north are thorny.

Aralia cordata var. sachalinensis at half its mature height.  A. continentalis grows even larger.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Pages

Log in or register to post comments