Sempervivum

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Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Here's some of my "wild" semps.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Hoy wrote:

Here's some of my "wild" semps.

Trond, you "wild semps" look very natural among rocks.  Since I have lost the labels on some of my semps, I too now have "wild semps" :D  I do like the tectorum forms very much; classic rosettes.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Here's an oddity on what is already an oddity... Sempervivum 'Oddity', that is, with a rosette that seems to lack chlorophyll.  Bizarre!

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

Hi guys!

I grow about twentyfive cultivars all unnamed. They suffer here during the summer months but recover in the fall and early winter. I have been moving starts to shady sights with better results,  but haven't taken the time to move all of the older clumps. I have been toying with the idea  of planting some at the bases of my cholla cactus. I think they would get enough shade from the branches to keep them from turning pale and losing leaves in our hot summer months. 

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Weiser wrote:

Hi guys!

I grow about twentyfive cultivars all unnamed. They suffer here during the summer months but recover in the fall and early winter. I have been moving starts to shady sights with better results,  but haven't taken the time to move all of the older clumps. I have been toying with the idea  of planting some at the bases of my cholla cactus. I think they would get enough shade from the branches to keep them from turning pale and losing leaves in our hot summer months. 

Fortunately I don't need to bring mine into shade although it is a bit dry here in June.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Trond, a most becoming handsome shot of your flowering semp; shorter more compact stems than many, in proportion to the rosettes, with harmonious colors.  Your photo reminds me why I love sempervivum, plants of simple pleasure. :D

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24

I like Trond's semp too. There are about fifty, maybe more, here. Little ones, medium ones, big ones. I bought so many this spring (again at Timberline, where there are rows upon rows of them) that some haven't been planted yet. I grow them in containers, mostly. Shallow Mexican clay dishes.
They're hybridizing and seeding around like crazy. The seedlings invaded one trough and the very lazy gardener here paid no attention until it was too late.
They cook in full sun in Denver, but they take the heat in stride.

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Nold wrote:

I like Trond's semp too. There are about fifty, maybe more, here. Little ones, medium ones, big ones. I bought so many this spring (again at Timberline, where there are rows upon rows of them) that some haven't been planted yet. I grow them in containers, mostly. Shallow Mexican clay dishes.
They're hybridizing and seeding around like crazy. The seedlings invaded one trough and the very lazy gardener here paid no attention until it was too late.
They cook in full sun in Denver, but they take the heat in stride.

Funny, I never thought about Sempervivums "cooking" in the sun and heat... I don't treat them as regular desert succulents as they are alpines after all, but I noticed today that a semp in a planter showed its inner leaves to be "fried" and scorched on this 99 F day, so I moved it out of the blazing sun and into some shade... it whispered a sigh of relief.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

I never grow my semps in containers as I have lots of natural cracks in the rock here. (Most of the semps I grow at our summerhouse.) They never get sun scorched either but now it is becoming quite dry so they roll themselves into small balls. We are still waiting for the warm weather we read in the papers that everybody else have (except Todd maybe!).

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Just made a new semp planter, this task taken not because of a design need, but more from an action to salvage some good semps that were sitting and suffering in small pots that haven't been replanted in 6-7 years!  The new planter is a very wide but shallow plastic (clay-emulating) dish, which is partially sunk into the ground. Six semps and one Jovibarba were planted, their colors long faded in the late summer doldrums, but I look to next spring and early summer to see the fruits of my effort.  Just so you know, the conspicuous plant labels will be removed as soon as I draw a map of the planter.  The stone used is native stuff unearthed whenever I dig into our so-called soil, and the stone chips are the same stone that I break up with a hammer to use as a top dressing.

The following were planted.
Refer to photo #2 (overhead view) for the following descriptions:

11 o'clock - S. 'Pacific Devils Food'- nice chocolate color but a difficult grower

12 o'clock - J. heuffelii 'Gold Bug' - ooh, at its peak, a rich golden yellow with red tips, small. One of the best.

1 o'clock - hard to see, a smidgeon of S. arachnoideum 'Album', but hopefully it'll regain a foothold here.

3 o'clock - S. 'Brock' - a medium size but imposing red, it has its showy season earlier in the year.

4 o'clock - S. arachnoideum 'Yukon Snow' - one of the whitest webbiest cobwebby types, nice.

6 o'clock - S. pittonii, a tight growing species with small rosettes & some dark leaf tips. Yellow flowers. Nice.

8-9 o'clock - S. 'More Honey', when at its peak of color, this yellowish amber one is excellent.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

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