Seed starting chronicles 2013

140 posts / 0 new
Last post
RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

I love every aspect of growing.  Even when things aren't successful, lessons learned are so valuable!

Mark, I didn't find any germination references specific to Alium sacculiferum, and I had so much of the seed from you that I planted an equal amount for two different germinating regimes:
1) Sow directly at room temperature.
2) Sow at 40F for 2.5 months, then room temperature.

Both were planted at the same time, and now it's time to bring trial #2 out of the fridge....

Aquilegia canadensis Little Lanterns is a dwarf strain.  It grows about a foot tall, and is dwarf in all respects.  I am a bit curious about the dark leaves of the seedlings.  The seed was collected from my own plant in 2012 that came from a commercial nursery in 2011.  I have never noticed that the mother plant had darkish leaves, and even though I was careful to collect seeds from only flowers that bloomed when no other aquilegia were blooming, I don't have any that have dark leaves anyway. 
   

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Gene Mirro
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-25

Mimulus lewisi, sown 2/27/13, germinated at 60F, grown under lights:

[attachthumb = 1]

SW Washington state, 600 ft. altitude

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

RickR wrote:

Aquilegia canadensis Little Lanterns is a dwarf strain.  It grows about a foot tall, and is dwarf in all respects. 

Thanks Rick, 'Little Lanterns' is exceedingly cute.  I've seen the all yellow variant named 'Corbett', didn't impress me seeing small plant in nursery centers, but now when I look via Google images, it can make a nice clump.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Tony Willis
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-01

I have now started sowing my fritillaria and lilies in pure cat litter (Sophisticat Pink). I use clay pots which are plunged in a sand bed. Just a top dressing of grit on the pots.I feed well until they die down and then repot them firstly to look at the results and secondly to space them out. This is easy as clean white bulbs are easily seen amongst the clay granules.

Fritillaria unibracteata just germinating from a January 2012 sowing

Fritillaria crassifolia from an August 2010 sowing germinated spring 2011

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Nomocharis aperta - planted 25Mar2013 at 60-65F.  Emerged in 31 days.
   

Allium carinatum ssp. pulchellum - planted 7Feb2013 outside temps. Emerged 29Apr2013.
   

Allium tricoccum - planted 19Mar2011 (dried seed),outside temps. Emerged 23April2013.
   

Other seeds up:
Allium narcissiflorum - planted 7Feb2013 outside temps. Emerged after two 70F days on 30Apr2013.
Allium ovalifolium - planted 3Feb2012 outside temps. Emerged after three 70F days on 1May2013.
Fritillaria meleagris alba - planted 3Feb2012 outside temps. Emerged after three 70F days on 1May2013, as expected.
Mertensia ciliata (Thanks Lori!) - planted 3Feb2012 outside temps. Emerged after three 70F days on 1May2013.
Oxytropis nana - planted 3Feb2012 outside temps, not scarified.  One seed germinated last season.  More emerged after three 70F days on 1May2013.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Hedysarum boreale ssp. boreale, I think.  As I was planting various species, I neglected to mark this one right away, so its identity is through a process of elimination.  Initially, I thought I might have it mixed up with Moltkia petraea, but I grew that seed last year and had taken and posted a photo for it in Seed Chronicles 2012.  (Everyone's additions here are very helpful!)  So it's not Moltkia.
So what do you think?  The seed would have come from Lori (Thanks!).

Emerged in 29 days at 60-65F.
   

A curious happening with this batch: all of the cotyledons grew in a somewhat "abnormal" fashion.  Most grew to "one side" as the seedling on the right.  But none emerged perfectly shaped, as one might expect.  Is this normal, or could it be due to some climatic factor?
   

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Rick, I think the cotyledons of Fabaceae species often are warped or asymmetric. Some don't even surface.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Gene Mirro
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-25

Mimulus lewisi, sown 2/27/13, grown under fluorescents at roughly 60F:

[attachthumb = 1]

These are perennial in the NW USA for 2-5 years if the soil is kept moist and cool.  They are native to wet places in the mountains above 5000 feet.

SW Washington state, 600 ft. altitude

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Those Mimulus have really come along, Gene! I'm thinking about getting something in this genus for damp lower edges (below grade) of some rock gardens, but I don't think I got any seed yet, unless there is some in my package from Kristl..lol

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Well done, Gene!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Pages

Log in or register to post comments