Seed starting chronicles 2012

197 posts / 0 new
Last post
Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Thanks Amy, then 2 years it is to see true leaves on Anemonopsis, they sure are slow!

May I recommend buying some "hardware cloth", typically available in hardware stores, sold by the foot or yard on rolls, as much as wanted.  Then with standard wire snips (also at the hardware store), I cut pieces of the wire mesh to cover my pots, turned down at the sides to hold the mesh in place.  When seeds germinate, the mesh can be easily bent to give some height to the covering to give seedlings some room and not have leaves pop up through the mesh and expand the leaves, making for a tricky situation removing the mesh eventually and no ripping the leaves off. It works well, even if the mesh is formed into a loose arch over the pots, so far squirrels and chipmunks leave such protected pots alone.

I no longer get great angst over incessant diggings of these varmints in my pots since I started using wire protection.  The wire covers can of course be re-used over and over.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

McDonough wrote:

Thanks Amy, then 2 years it is to see true leaves on Anemonopsis, they sure are slow!

May I recommend buying some "hardware cloth", typically available in hardware stores, sold by the foot or yard on rolls, as much as wanted.  Then with standard wire snips (also at the hardware store), I cut pieces of the wire mesh to cover my pots, turned down at the sides to hold the mesh in place.  When seeds germinate, the mesh can be easily bent to give some height to the covering to give seedlings some room and not have leaves pop up through the mesh and expand the leaves, making for a tricky situation removing the mesh eventually and no ripping the leaves off. It works well, even if the mesh is formed into a loose arch over the pots, so far squirrels and chipmunks leave such protected pots alone.

I no longer get great angst over incessant diggings of these varmints in my pots since I started using wire protection.  The wire covers can of course be re-used over and over.

Mark, do you have a picture of your "hardware cloth"? Don't know whether something like that exists here.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

A few more things germinating - here Eriogonum ovalifolium, Lomatium californicum and three Asclepias, hallii, latifolia and asperula (from Alplains), which I am particularly excited by if I can grow them on to flowering. These were all sown and kept in the fridge for 6 weeks before bringing out into the greenhouse. All this propagating is beginning to bear fruit as we fill the greenhouses with young plants on the nursery. And finally a lovely surprise in the garden, a mass of Trillium rivale seedlings next to the parent plants. For many years I only had one clone and never got seed set, but have planted several plants from different sources together. However, I didn't expect such largesse!

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Trond, hardware cloth is just a welded wire mesh - see photos:
http://www.google.ca/search?client=safari&rls=en&q=hardware+clth&oe=UTF-...

I'm considering making covers, as you suggest, Mark, for the troughs out front.  The jackrabbits continued their munching this year (despite less snow cover and presumably more choice of things to eat) and nipped off my Prunus prostrata and a little juniper through the winter.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

McDonough wrote:

Lori, I keep wondering where you are going to put all those new treasures ;) 

Ha, at the rate that I kill stuff off??  :o  Just (mostly) kidding.  ;D ;D 
Well, I did go overboard on seeding but think I have enough room in the existing and new beds for a couple of representatives of each new species... just not room for 5 or 6 of them.    ;) 

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

AmyO
AmyO's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-06

McDonough wrote:

May I recommend buying some "hardware cloth", typically available in hardware stores, sold by the foot or yard on rolls, as much as wanted.  Then with standard wire snips (also at the hardware store), I cut pieces of the wire mesh to cover my pots, turned down at the sides to hold the mesh in place.  When seeds germinate, the mesh can be easily bent to give some height to the covering to give seedlings some room and not have leaves pop up through the mesh and expand the leaves, making for a tricky situation removing the mesh eventually and no ripping the leaves off. It works well, even if the mesh is formed into a loose arch over the pots, so far squirrels and chipmunks leave such protected pots alone.

I no longer get great angst over incessant diggings of these varmints in my pots since I started using wire protection.  The wire covers can of course be re-used over and over.

I have made a few flat covers with hardware cloth already and use them, I just have so many pots & trays to cover! I need to find a less expensive way to protect my 'babies'.  :-[

Amy Olmsted
Hubbardton, VT, Zone 4

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Have you considered using chickenwire in the same way, Amy?  It costs less than hardware cloth.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Lori wrote:

Trond, hardware cloth is just a welded wire mesh - see photos:
http://www.google.ca/search?client=safari&rls=en&q=hardware+clth&oe=UTF-...

Thanks Lori. I supposed it was something like that. I use chickenwire against hares and European elk(!)

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Here are a couple views of peat flats protected with small rectangles of "hardware cloth" or "welded wire fabric" or "welded wire mesh", all terms for basically the same thing.  In the photo on the right, the mesh has been loosened to allow room for the developing Jeffersonia seedlings.

 

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

They look pretty tough, Mark, not like the chicken wire I use! But my main problem is not warmblooded animals either. . . .  However I could need it where I plant some of my bulbs. They are often dug up and eaten by some animal.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Pages

Log in or register to post comments