Saxes in 2012

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Sellars
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Joined: 2009-12-29

That's a nice spiny sax Trond. It is not available here.

Did you grow it from seed?

David Sellars
From the Wet Coast of British Columbia, Canada

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Sellars
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Joined: 2009-12-29

It has been very cool and wet this month in coastal British Columbia and the Saxifraga oppositifolia are still in flower in the garden.

David Sellars
From the Wet Coast of British Columbia, Canada

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Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

David wrote:

That's a nice spiny sax Trond. It is not available here.

Did you grow it from seed?

David, I have a couple of big clumps of Saxifraga juniperifolia subsp. macedonica (S. sancta v. macedonica) and could try to get some cuttings going for you, if this particular one is of interest.
Interesting that S. oppositifolia is still in bloom there!  It is such an early bloomer in the wild here that I only manage to catch a few of the latest flowers.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

David wrote:

That's a nice spiny sax Trond. It is not available here.

Did you grow it from seed?

David, I do not remember! (And I do not file my plants :-\) It is two possibilities however, either did I grow it from seed myself or I got it from someone who had. I have had it for more than 10 years. . . .
Seems you can get it from Lori, But I'll look for seed anyway.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

cohan
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Joined: 2011-02-03

Nice one, Trond, looks like a nice small plant..
David- looks like a generously flowering form..

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Peden
Title: Member
Joined: 2012-01-04

I think this is 'Princess'. all of my surviving Kabschias have been around long enoug that tags have faded, been crushed under clumsy feet, or been eaten by birds. Y'all know the drill!

Image may not show in "preview". My apology if it does not post or posts funny.

The plant has large frilly white flowers on red stems. The leaves are needle-like. The bun is some 2 inches across; six-seven year's growth?

Michael Peden
Lake Champlain Valley, zone 4b
Four and a half months frost free
Snow cover not guaranteed

Hoy
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Joined: 2009-12-15

It definitely looks like a princess to me ;D

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Sellars
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Joined: 2009-12-29

That Princess is a very nice and unusual form of Saxifraga burseriana named by Lincoln Foster  I haven't seen it available in these parts.

David Sellars
From the Wet Coast of British Columbia, Canada

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Peden
Title: Member
Joined: 2012-01-04

Here's a few more storied saxifrages: image #001: clockwise from lower right, up along the great ridge of Saxifrage Meadows and down again; 'Orava' and 'Jana'; these two from ca. 2005/2004 when I was a fairly regular attendee at Berkshire Chapter meets -what fun! Wrightman's was there. These were offered as a cuttings at one of Harvey's tufa workshops.Then there is one of the Megaseaflora types; 'Jupiter' is it? -or maybe 'Aretiastrum'? ...Galaxy? I'm sure I tried all of them and they all came from Siskiyou Rare Plant Nursery in the late 90's. This one likely became "favored" five years or so ago as it is obviously pretty and had probably begun to dwindle. Now there's plenty (never enough of any Kabschia really); Saxifraga 'Federici-augusti' probably also from Siskiyou in ancient days;a huge (pieced) clump of 'Irvingii-Jenkensiae' at top -down to one of my own raisings (look! a tag!). A few years back when my little alpine house was in effect I raised a bunch of Kabschias from seed. Most were sold or died. This is very likely the last survivor from that raising. The final two groups, center one is past and faded, are pink 'x anglica' sorts, I think -likely from Siskiyou though, perhaps, Arrowhead. Aren't they pretty when selected colors are grown together? Image #012 S. 'Federici-augusti'(could be another) isn't why I built this white garden in 2010 but heck -take a looky! Image #023 is 'Gold Dust' from Mt.Tahoma Nursery ca. 2002/2004; strong grower/good color. Image #027; 'Lutea'. I really like this color theme. This one came from Wrightman's in those glorious Berkshire days, purchased in a tufa cube. The tufa cube was situated in the rockery where it still resides, but the plant showed signs of stress so "the obvious" precaution was needed -propagate! Looks like we're all gonna get along just fine in the new garden! I know; I should have waited ten years before taking this photo; my bad. Image #037; This one I really thought I'd lose -and yet may. 'Ariel'(Siskiyou) has been kicking around for more than a decade. I hope we are looking at a new dawn here for these scant remains of this beautiful hybrid. Image #040; I really think this is a seedling of (still extant) S. marginata 'Rocheliana'. Kabschia season here was chilly and arid. The white flowers pink out in these conditions.

Michael Peden
Lake Champlain Valley, zone 4b
Four and a half months frost free
Snow cover not guaranteed

Peden
Title: Member
Joined: 2012-01-04

Saxifraga x bertolonii was grown from seed sent by a British colleague in 1999.

I did plant S. x Andrewsii but I don't entirely think this is it (I killed alot of Saxifrages in my day). So. Maybe this is a seedling? Anyway; great foliage plant! The interloper is Vaccinium vitis idea 'minus' which is slow growing and is easily pulled out of the Saxifrage when it gets in, which it often does given its stoloniferous nature. The Saxifrage has been favored by my attentiveness; how nice for it!

S. bronchialis is heralding in the silver saxifrage season here.

Here's a double flowering Meadow Saxifrage curious in behavior as it dries up and acts like a bulb for most of the year.

Michael Peden
Lake Champlain Valley, zone 4b
Four and a half months frost free
Snow cover not guaranteed

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