Salvia Dorrii a great western shrub!!

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Fermi
Fermi's picture
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Joined: 2010-03-03

Lori,
I've found S. pachyphylla a delight with silver/greyish foliage and flowers of mauve-purple in reddish bracts (? trying to rely on memory so maybe unreliable!) but unfortunately it succumbed to our unusually wet summer and I have yet to re-establish it.
S. chamaedryoides spreads by stolons and by seed but it isn't too aggressive! A wonderful mass of grey in the rock garden; highlighted by blue flowers floating above the foliage - a great shrub.
cheers
fermi

Fermi de Sousa,
Central Victoria, Australia
Min: -7C, Max: +40C

cohan
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

I'm keen to try some of these! Great fat leaves on that one Lori!

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

Salvia pachyphylla is an early fall bloomer when there is little else in bloom. It takes center stage in my fall garden demanding your attention for three to four weeks. Humming birds and bees both seek it's nectar.

Here are a couple of shots of Salvia pachyphylla  from my garden.

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Both S. dorrii and S. pachyphylla look like very fine plants.  Thanks for posting those tempting pictures, John and Panayoti!  It's great to have some later bloom, as in the case of S. pachyphylla... (though with fall-blooming species from more southerly areas, it's always a consideration whether they will bloom early enough here to prevent the buds being killed by frost... but I'm getting way ahead of myself - gotta winter it over a few more times first, or else this is all just wishful thinking anyway!!) 

McDonough wrote:

I've been entertaining a hybridization effort with Salvia, to produce hardier ones than the many tender ones currently being created.  As an aside, I'm also thinking about working on fall blooming hardy Salvia, such as the glutinous-leaved yellow-flowered S. koyumae, which can also be grown and flowered in shade.

Mark, does Salvia glutinosa fit anywhere into that scheme?  The flowers are rather more interesting than S. koyumae (which I am not familiar with, other than from googling just now) (though I understand part of the latter's appeal is its shade tolerance).  Since S. glutinosa seems to like rather more water than our otherwise-cool climate naturally provides, I wonder if it might not do reasonably well in shade also?  (Hope you know what I mean by that...  :P)

Kelaidis wrote:

I have grown several forms of Salvia dorrii (although I have yet to get my hands on those tiny mat forming ones):

Tiny, mat-forming ones?? Wow, sounds nice!

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

cohan
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

'Fall blooming' are also words that worry me ;) though there are (frost tolerant) things in flower very late here-- native asters, non-native honeysuckles and violas have all been in flower here 6 weeks or more into our regular frost season, after lows of -10C or much lower..
For more sensitive species, I suppose it depends what their triggers are-cool nights? might flower in mid-summer ;) short days? by september, regular frosts are almost guaranteed, even if days may be warm....

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Weiser wrote:

Salvia pachyphylla is an early fall bloomer when there is little else in bloom. It takes center stage in my fall garden demanding your attention for three to four weeks. Humming birds and bees both seek it's nectar.

Here are a couple of shots of Salvia pachyphylla  from my garden.

John, Salvia pachyphylla looks to be a fabulous "must have" species, although I have not tried it yet.  I'm also a big fan of late summer or early fall blooming plants, and this would be a welcome addition.  I can envision growing it with the soft coral orange of Agastache (I have an aurantiaca x rupestris cross) which will grow here but they are not overly permanent (lasting 2-3 years), fortunately perpetuated by self-sown seedlings.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Fermi
Fermi's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-03-03

Fermi wrote:

We had Salvia pachyphylla until the recent unseasonable rain :'( and will have to replace it and get S. dorrii from seed as it's allowed into Australia.
cheers
fermi

Just checked the seeds we got from the NARGS Seedex and sure enough there is a packet of Salvia dorrii ssp dorrii ...donated by Weiser of NV! ;D
Hopefully I'll get these sown before we go to the UK for the Alpines Conference in April.
cheers
fermi

Fermi de Sousa,
Central Victoria, Australia
Min: -7C, Max: +40C

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

Glad to hear you receaved some dorrii to try. The key is to grow it dry once it is established.  In its native habitate around Reno it gets from 15-25 cm of moisture per season. Most of that coming in the winter and early spring.

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

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