Salvia blepharochlaena

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Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27
Salvia blepharochlaena

Is anyone growing this species? I grew it from seed this year and am curious what the flowers, mature plant, etc. will look like. Despite being able to google various studies of its chemical components, and discovering that it's on someone's list of "desirable species", I can't find a picture of it! If you grow it (or are a more dogged internet searcher than I am), I'd love to see a photo of it!
Thanks in advance.

Peter George
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-03

I imagine that the only person who has actually seen it in situ is Jurasek, and he probably has a picture. Otherwise, there appears to be nothing available. Do check The Rock Garden Database for some basic information about the plant.

Peter George, Petersham, MA (north central MA, close to the NH/VT borders), zones 5b and 6 around the property.

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

... and presumably the collector whose seed I grew.   :)  I did take a look at The Rock Garden Database, as that was one of references that came up - some good info there.   Thank you very much for looking, Peter.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Skulski wrote:

... and Pavelka too, presumably, whose seed I grew.   :)  I did take a look at The Rock Garden Database, as that was one of references that came up - some good info there.   Thank you very much for looking, Peter.

You're right Lori, Google comes up high and dry on locating a photo on this one.  From the names of the authors of the species (Hedge and Huber-Morath), I recognize it as a Turkish plant, and it is listed in VanFlora, but again, no pictures.  Also found the species on the Jurasek seedlist.  At least I found a plant description, that gives an idea about what it looks like.  When yours flowers, and hopefully it matches the description, you post a photo here... and your photo will be the one that'll get found on Google :D

How about in any of the various Salvia books out there, I know there are several such books, although I don't have any.

Salvia  blepharochlaena Hedge et Huber-Morath, plant description:
http://www.kadel.cz/flora/e/kvCard.asp-Id=5607.htm

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Thanks for looking too, Mark.  Unfortunately, I don't have any books specifically on salvia either.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Kelaidis
Kelaidis's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-03

Do keep us posted on its progress: I am an afficionado of Turkish Salvia, and Salvia in general (I have dozens of species at my home, and dread to imagine how many at the Gardens!)

Right now several forms of Greggii are blooming away, not to mention Salvia microphylla 'Hotlips', Salvia moorcroftiana, Salvia x 'Raspberry Delight', and a phalanx of Salvia sclarea (I don't have the heart to get rid of it entirely, and it comes back so strong...) and more...

Salvia ringens at Denver Botanic Gardens is unbelievable right now...more than two meters tall, dozens of them blooming amid a forest of giant mulleins...

For every minion of the peaks there are a dozen steppe children growing in the dry Continental heart of all hemispheres still unknown to horticulture.

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Unfortunately, those real traffic-stoppers - S. greiggii, microphylla - aren't hardy here, dang!  <much gnashing of teeth!>  
Hmm, given it's provenance, S. ringens might be a possibility for growing here.
http://pack.aspeco.net/grande/27044/salvia_ringens.jpg

... as might S. moorcroftiana - delightfully furry leaves on that one!
http://www.google.ca/imgres?imgurl=http://www.botanic.jp/plants-sa/salmo...
=97&tbnw=129&prev=/images%3Fq%3DSalvia%2Bmoorcroftiana,%26um%3D1%26hl%3Den%26client%3D
safari%26sa%3DN%26rls%3Den%26tbs%3Disch:1

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Boland
Boland's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

We have a hard time growing the culinary sage, let alone the fancy types!

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Culinary sage is marginally hardy here, for me - will sometimes last a couple years but not reliably.  S. nemorosa and its many cultivars (including also ssp. tesquicola, which is very floriferous and showy) seem to be totally hardy, as are S. pratensis, verticillata 'Purple Rain', glutinosa, juriscii (having said that, I did lose my old plant this year, unaccountably)... that's about all I got (hence my desire to branch out!)  It must be rainfall/drainage if those are not hardy for you, Todd, I would guess... ?

S. pachyphylla, from seed in '09, made it through the winter in a very exposed spot.
I'm also trying S. verbenacea and S. campanulata, neither of which looks too showy.
http://online-media.uni-marburg.de/biologie/botex/mallorca05/bildgross/s...
http://mygarden.uphero.com/Salvia%20campanulata.jpg

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Kelaidis
Kelaidis's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-03

Lori! Lori! Lori! You have Salvia campanulata? I believe that's what I keyed out a certain white flowered Salvia that grew everywhere in the foothills of the Jade Dragon Mountains a few years ago when I visited in late May: wonderful racemes of creamy white...I have been looking for this for years! If it's the same thing, you will be delighted. It should be easy to grow in standard rock garden culture, although it grew near no end of treasures (vast meadows studded with every color form of Roscoea, gesneriads growing on gravel, Arisaemas in full sun and Cypripedia in many colors in the woods, including C. pletrochilum looking exactly like C. arietinum only growing in dryish pine woods alongside tiny iris and on and on and on...boulders studded with Pleione and Primula forrestii...yes Salvia campanulata is worth it!

For every minion of the peaks there are a dozen steppe children growing in the dry Continental heart of all hemispheres still unknown to horticulture.

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