Rhodohypoxis

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Reed
Reed's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-10-09

I don't know how cold they can take, but I know they can take 9 deg f. without snow cover, I know that is not as cold as many your zones though. But cold and wet sometimes are worse and I do fall in that category.

Albany, Oregon USA. Pacific Northwest, elevation approximately 200ft zone 8. Winter wet and Summer Dry. Hot enough to ripen the peaches.

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

James, 9 degrees F seems pretty cold even thought the bulbs are underground.  Is the ground frozen, and to the depth of the "bulbs"? And how deep are the "bulbs"?  Did you say you knew the species of your Rhodohypoxis?

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mattus
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-10-01

Here are a few images of my Rhodohypoxis containers from earlier this year, in spring. As I mentioned, I plant my Rhodohypoxis baurii in window boxes, which I then bring into the cold greenhouse for the winter, where they remain dry under the benches. I divide them ever few years, and now have many.

Matt Mattus
USDA Zone 5B
Worcester, MA

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

They look spectacular, Matt!

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Impressive!
It seems you are growing Diascia and Jovellana in pots too. Are those hardy in your climate?

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

And may I say Matt, spectacular and impressive!

The Chapter member here in Minnesota that grows them sifts through the soil each fall to find the subterranean structures to overwinter dormant inside.  It would seem just growing them in a pot or trough and bringing in the container for winter would be a lot simpler.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Matt, impressive planters indeed!  In the photo named "rhodo3.jpg", is the pale bluish-white shrubby plant a Prostanthera (Australian mintbush) or a Calamintha, looks like a Lamiaceae to me.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Mark, I think you are right. I first took it for a Jovellana but Prostanthera cuneata is a better candidate.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Reed
Reed's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-10-09

James, 9 degrees F seems pretty cold even thought the bulbs are underground.  Is the ground frozen, and to the depth of the "bulbs"? And how deep are the "bulbs"?  Did you say you knew the species of your Rhodohypoxis?

Hi Rick,
Sorry It took me so long to reply I have been busy with school. But yes, the ground was frozen solid for three days last winter and about a week the winter before. I plant mine about 2-3 inches deep, but the ones that I had growing in clay soil were only about 1 inch under the soil line. I am still very surprised the ones in the clay soil lived. The ones I grow ouside for sure is Rhodohypoxis baurii.  I will say that nearly all the ones that I forgot to take into the garage that I was growing in pots did die. (the cold snap came with very little warning and it was not reported to get that cold) So now the only ones I have left are the few that lived the winter in the pots and the others that I planted out in the ground. 

Albany, Oregon USA. Pacific Northwest, elevation approximately 200ft zone 8. Winter wet and Summer Dry. Hot enough to ripen the peaches.

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Thanks James. That gives me a good idea of how cold the soil really got.  (not very, compared to Minnesota standards)  But about what I might expect there.  :)

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

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