Rhodohypoxis

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Hoy
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Joined: 2009-12-15
Rhodohypoxis

Now I have acquired Rhodohypoxis 'Hebron' and two other cultivars and I am going to try them outside. 'Hebron' at least should be hardy here.

Kelaidis
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Joined: 2010-02-03

That's wild!

I am amazed that Rhodohypoxis are not proving hardier in more places: they are universal in the high Drakensberg...growing alongside lots of plants that are indestructible in gardens. I remember seeing a big planting in a garden near Goteborg...but I think he protected them in winter with some cover.

For every minion of the peaks there are a dozen steppe children growing in the dry Continental heart of all hemispheres still unknown to horticulture.

harold peachey
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Joined: 2010-03-22

Here in Central New York Rhodohypoxis baurii are proving extremely adaptable.  I grow them in the open garden, a bog and even in a sand bed-all are thriving and blooming nicely.

Harold Peachey
USDA Z5, Onondaga, NY US

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Peachey wrote:

Here in Central New York Rhodohypoxis baurii are proving extremely adaptable.  I grow them in the open garden, a bog and even in a sand bed-all are thriving and blooming nicely.

Really?  That's interesting news... Harold, your climate and mine can't be that different, so perhaps a glimmer of hope these can be tried outside.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
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Joined: 2009-12-15

I have read about people here in Norway growing Rhodohypoxis outside for years and I bought the variety 'Hebron' from a nursery in Northern Norway, they claim it is very hardy. I tried some in a pot some years ago and they survived for several years. I kept the pot completely dry in winter so the plants presumably died of lack of water!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Jeddeloh
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-05-02

I don't think rhodohypoxis give a rip about winter moisture but they sure care about air around their roots. I have some growing in the spaghnum layer of my carnivorous plant bog and they're very happy and very frost hardy despite the 40 inches (1 meter) of rain we get in the winter.  I'm sure the issue is drainage aka air around the roots because I had tried them in various positions in the open garden and they disappeared over the winter.  But in the well aerated spaghnum layer they're quite happy, coming up reliably every year. 

I keep my pots of rhodohypoxis dry in the winter so obviously they don't require much moisture in winter.  They just don't mind it if their roots are properly aerated.

Jan in Portland, Oregon, Zone 8 where it should start raining for at least the next six months soon.

Jan Jeddeloh, Portland, Oregon, USA, Zone 8.  Rainy winters (40 inches or 1 meter) and pleasant dry summers which don't start until July most years!

Reed
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Joined: 2010-10-09

Rhodohypoxis do great outside in Oregon. I have them growing in both my rock garden and in open ground with clay soil and we are no strangers to cold winter wet weather here in the Pacific Northwest. Nearly all my bulbs from South Africa do well outside even with our cold winter snaps the last two years down to about 10 or so deg.F..

Albany, Oregon USA. Pacific Northwest, elevation approximately 200ft zone 8. Winter wet and Summer Dry. Hot enough to ripen the peaches.

Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Reed wrote:

Rhodohypoxis do great outside in Oregon. I have them growing in both my rock garden and in open ground with clay soil and we are no strangers to cold winter wet weather here in the Pacific Northwest. Nearly all my bulbs from South Africa do well outside even with our cold winter snaps the last two years down to about 10 or so deg.F..

Reed, this gives me hope! What other S.A. bulbs do you grow? Have you started them from seed? (Silverhill maybe?)

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

We have a Chapter member that grows a Rhodohypoxis sp. here in Minnesota.  Of course, she grows it as a tender bulb, and overwinters the tuberous rhizomes inside.

Welcome to the forum Reed!

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mattus
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-10-01

I've grow many Rhodohypoxis, wintering them over in the greenhouse under a bench, where they go dry in the winter, and then outdoors in the spring and summer, where they bloom like crazy. I have tried some in troughs, as temporary annuals, but they never survive the winters here in central Massachusetts, nor do I expect them to. I may try some in the alpine beds, or even in the ground, since I am curious if I have some sweet spots where they might survive, such as near a foundation.
I have so many Rhodohypoxis varieties now ( all with lost labels), that I simply divide them in the winter, and plant up window boxes with them, that I use in the summer to edge the deck with. The flowers a dense and full in the early spring, but the foliage is equally as fine in the summer, since it remains grass-like and attractive in a simple way.

Matt Mattus
USDA Zone 5B
Worcester, MA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Hello Matt, welcome to the forum, so glad you made it over here!

I don't currently grow any Rhodohypoxis, but am certainly tempted by them.  I have but one windowsill in my basement deep enough that I can overwinter tender things, and I use it to overwinter my collection of little yellow Nothoscordum species... perhaps you have some from those that I spread around the New England Chapter NARGS meetings.  Since they grow and flower both in the autumn and in spring, I wonder how these little yellow cuties would look growing together with white, pink, and red Rhodohypoxis.  The Nothoscordums, like N. montevidense, also take some frost but I understand are not overly hardy... but I have never tested them.  Perhaps, like your plan to find that microclimate sweet spot for Rhodohypoxis outdoor winter trials, I could try the same with Nothoscordum.

By the way, Frank Simpson in southern New Hampshire has Agapanthus that are perfectly hardy in New England, I thought these were a myth too.  So, maybe some Rhodohypoxis are worth trying outdoors, or even trying some seed-grown ones outdoors with the chance of hardier progeny.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

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