Re: Ribes

59 posts / 0 new
Last post
Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Todd wrote:

Cohan, your Ribes does look like hudsonianum.  Mine is not a perfect fit but i could not find any other AB species that looks like the one I phootgraphed in SW Alberta.  Lori, do you have any insights?

No, sorry.  I haven't paid enough attention to the native Ribes to add anything.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Trond, I have not collected much seed so far- I have not heard from anyone interested in them, but I could collect if there was interest.. Kristl at Gardens North has found them to be difficult to sell, mostly, so she could not use them apart from a couple 'star' species that are not in my area...lol
I haven't yet started planting them on purpose in my yard, though there are some growing already, esp R triste; I'm planning to try some cuttings. R hudsonianum is a fave and another is Ribes glandulosum- Skunk Currant/Skunkberry  which has perhaps the most compact growth of any of the local species, and lovely leaves... berries are described as disagreeable, but I think I disagreed...lol. certainly they are attractive berries, and the flowers are nice too...
First 4 photos, Ribes glandulosum, I think..
then another species, growing right beside it.., 5,6

While I'm there, Maianthemum trifolium,7,  and  Rubus arcticus, 8 not too far away.... and another Caltha palustris, 9

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Thanks for the move, Lori, I thought we were getting into that kind of territory...lol

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Another.. I think this is a gooseberry type- I don't know if the distinction between gooseberry and currant types has any botanical siginificance, or whether its just about use?? The ones I think of as gooseberries do seem to tend to smaller leaves, and perhaps there are some common floral characters in each of the groups-- note the unmarked and un-bristled flower in this plant compared to spotted and/or bristled flowers of R triste, R glandulosum ..

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

I don't know if some of these variations are actually different species, or just variable species.. this would be an advantage of growing some of these from cuttings, I could compare through the year.. by the time they are in fruit, I don't always remember what flowers they had- since the plants occur throughout the wooded and semi-wooded parts of the farm (every couple of metres, in some areas) and there can be several different plants growing together in many places...
Note a pinker gooseberry type flower in a couple of shots (I doubt the colour is diagnostic, since other species colours vary) and a couple of leaf forms-- these are not fully leafed out, but you can see a more lobed and a less lobed type...

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Growing close to the previous plants, here is a much darker flower form of Ribes glandulosum; While individual plants are scattered through wooded areas, often beside larger trees to reduce the impact of grazing cattle (not sure if they are grazed at all, or if the issue is only trampling), many of these plants I've shown so far are in patches on/among old brush piles or even between fallen trees/branches etc-- again, these are areas less convenient for cattle to graze (doesn't mean they don't/can't go there, but its not their  first choice if there is plenty of material to graze) and many shrubs thrive in these areas- Loniceras, Symphoricarpos, Ribes etc. The rest of the shots show something of this kind of fallen tree habitat; 4 shows the sort of low thicket that can have several species intertwined, and more over some square metres.. some forbs also thrive in this habitat, in spots not overwhelmed by the woodies. as this Mertensia paniculata, 5. 6,7 show a bit of an overview; off to one side, more among the trees is a large stand of what I think is Symphoricarpos occidentalis- at any rate, larger plants than our much more common S. albus... Note, esp in the last shot-- outside this tangled area the cattle have the 'grass' grazed quite low, so this kind of spot is a key refuge for many species....

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

cohan wrote:

Trond, I have not collected much seed so far- I have not heard from anyone interested in them, but I could collect if there was interest.. Kristl at Gardens North has found them to be difficult to sell, mostly, so she could not use them apart from a couple 'star' species that are not in my area...lol

Cohan, if you have the chance I would love to try some of the species you deem better! I have ordered from Kristl but she hadn't many Ribes as you say.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lockwood
Lockwood's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-18

Such beautiful bushes/shrubs!  I love our native Ribes sanguineum we have them scattered around our 8 acres.  They are a favorite of hummingbirds.

Julie

Julie
Greetings from SW Washington The Evergreen State
USDA Zone 8b −9.4 °C (15 °F) -6.7 °C (20 °F)
Heat Zone 4 15-30 days exceeding 30°C(86°F)

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Trond, I will keep you in mind for those ( I was watching for a few things for you this year, but I seemed to not find fruit/seed on any of them- I did get, I think, one berry of Geocaulon lividum, not sure where it is, but I have a long overdue burst of seed sorting and sowing to come..lol; found no seed on Maianthemum trifolium, not sure if it was not a good year for them, or if my timing was off-- the year before I had seed...) I'd prob give you Ribes triste, R hudsonianum and R glandulosum-- the first two are right on my acreage, with colour variants of triste easy to find, and glandulosum I know from two or three spots easy to find on the farm.. luckily the birds do not clean out all the currant berries as fast as they do some other things (very difficult most years to get seed of Amelanchier alnifolia- often stripped just on the verge of ripening!)..

Lockwood-- thanks! sanguineum looks exquisite! If you haven't already done it somewhere on the forum, an intro would be welcome, there is a thread specially for it :) You can also add first name and general location etc to your message signature if you like- we always are interested to know where everyone is :)

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

That's fine Cohan! I have a list of your wishes too and if you have more wishes, please tell me.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Pages

Log in or register to post comments