Re: Image of the day - 2013

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Hoy
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Joined: 2009-12-15

I am inclined to do what Mark does, refuse to use the new Latin names at least for a while. I think we are in the middle of a transition from the old way of using (minute) physical observable traits to genetic ones. Until that is more consistent for all the taxonomy I think it will be a little messy.

Nice Trilliums Mark! I have several pots with seedlings now. They sprouted outside during the mild spell around Xmas and I had to bring them inside. Hope they survive the next 5 years!

Cohan, Apocynum looks exciting!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

A word of warning with Apocynum androsaemifolium, take note of its common name: Spreading Dogbane
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=APAN2&mapType=nativity&photoI...

In the USDA link, it says "This plant can be weedy or invasive according to the authoritative sources noted below" (then gives a number of links).

It is a pretty plant when in full flower, but the underground rhizomes run deep, then pop up new shoots several feet away, its not possible to actually get the horizontal root when pulling out unwanted vigorous shoots.  I'm pulling them out all the time.  Here, the plants look pretty as they start flowering, but becomes decimated and unsightly from some sort of caterpillar that devours the foliage.

According to the USDA, there are many synonyms, so perhaps the plant is variable geographically.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Tingley
Title: Member
Joined: 2013-01-07

There is a large patch of Apocynum androsaemifolium growing just a block away from home. It is one of those plants I prefer to enjoy in situ, rather than adding it to a garden. Mark's caution about its spreading nature is good advice! Now, if someone could share a foolproof way to eradicate Campanula rapunculoides, I'd be a happy camper! I can't believe some seedhouses still sell this thug!

Southwest Nova Scotia, zone 6b or thereabouts

cohan
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Joined: 2011-02-03

Re: names- the new genetic studies are promising but still have some of the same limitations as physical studies, such as the samples used, the things the researchers are looking for etc; an example I think I've mentioned before is with the Aloids (Aloe, Haworthia, Gasteria etc) in South Africa.There is huge disagreement in this group of plants- Haworthia has been divided into as many as 600sp and as few as 60 or less by various people, and recent genetic studies have done little to clarify the issue. How do you even get adequate sampling in a genus where hundreds of different populations separated by a few kilometres are often very physically divergent and indeterminately related?

Re:Apocynum Mark's cautions are good to keep in mind, especially for anyone looking at growing the plant outside its natural range. Here it's an occasional native, and I have seen a couple of extensive patches in roadsides, but no more so than many other things which are much more common. I suspect planting it in cultivated soil with no competition would turn it into an entirely different beast. I'd like to get some on my acreage, but I would put it in wild open woodland/woodland edge with an intact native flora/sod, where it can happily/hopefully spread a few square metres where it has to compete with other strong plants such as fireweed, asters and various small woodies, and where I also intend to add Anemone canadensis (a fairly common local) and Aralia nudicaulis, another occasional native.

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Hoy
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Joined: 2009-12-15

My intention too had been to plant Apocynum in my woodland. Maybe it could compete with the slugs!

It is a long time since I stopped regarding species (and plant species in particular)  as discrete entities. In my opinion life is better regarded as a more or less continuous gene pool with some individuals sharing more genes than others ;D
 

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Hoy wrote:

My intention too had been to plant Apocynum in my woodland. Maybe it could compete with the slugs!

Apocynum androsaemifolium is a sun lover; it'll persist at the shady fringes of woodlands, but it wants sun.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

cohan
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Joined: 2011-02-03

There are  two sites fairly nearby that I know the Apocynum from - one is on a modest roadside embankment facing more or less east, most of the plants being right at the edge of a wooded area, at the base of poplars etc, so I imagine they get direct sun only in the morning at most; the other site is another roadside- the one I showed above, and you can see those are mostly in sun, though surrounded with other vegetation.
Here are a few shots from the shadier location; the darkest view is a bit misleading, as the exposure was set for the light coloured flowers. You can see that most of the plants are in dappled sun at this time in mid-afternoon.. I haven't compared flowering in the two sites to see if there are more flowers in the sunnier location.. This is the first site I found (growing up, I knew them from the roadside by my family's farmstead, up the road, but they no longer grow there) and I quite like this little colony..
Also, since I mentioned it earlier, Aralia nudicaulis growing  a little farther down the road from this site, just inside a mostly poplar wood..

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

McDonough wrote:

Hoy wrote:

My intention too had been to plant Apocynum in my woodland. Maybe it could compete with the slugs!

Apocynum androsaemifolium is a sun lover; it'll persist at the shady fringes of woodlands, but it wants sun.

Shouldn't be a nuisance then ;)  Thanks Mark, I'll keep in mind if I ever get the chance!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

cohan
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Joined: 2011-02-03

1,2 Geranium richardsonii with a visitor (looks like maybe she's rolling up the petals, but not sure)..
3,4 Cornus canadensis
5 Galium triflorum (I think)

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

cohan
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Joined: 2011-02-03

Gentianella amarella which we were recently discusssing here:
http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?topic=365.0

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

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