Re: Image of the day - 2013

275 posts / 0 new
Last post
Brian_W
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-04-28

Greetings,

This is an excellent thread with a lot of plant diversity.

Stanleya tomentosa:  endemic to the Pryor mountains/BigHorn basin desert in south central Montana and adjacent Wyoming.  This species is monocarpic, starting life as a simple rosette of fuzzy blue/green leaves before sending up a solitary inflorescence. 

Flower power:



I think this species would look spectacular scattered about in a dryland garden, or even a large rock garden.  In the pryors, they are common on the windswept limestone plateaus, growing among cushions plants.

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Wow, impressive plant!  Brian, just how tall do you estimate that spire is. in that last photo?

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Very cool indeed, Brian! Like Mark, I'm curious about the size.. this would be a very interesting plant to try..

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Brian_W
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-04-28

Greetings,

The height of Stanleya tomentosa varies depending on conditions.  Usually around 3-6 feet tall is average.  The last one is exceptional and would be toward the taller end of the spectrum.  I sent seed of this species to the Denver Botanical Gardens.  I've been told that Mike Bone has a lot of experience propagating Stanleyas. 

A few more:

Seeing this makes me anticipate spring:

http://i1072.photobucket.com/albums/w362/townsendia/random%20stuff/pasqu...

Ipomopsis spicata var. orchidacea: VERY fragrant flowers

http://i1072.photobucket.com/albums/w362/townsendia/random%20stuff/038_z...

Astragalus platytropis: a tiny species with wonderful pods

http://i1072.photobucket.com/albums/w362/townsendia/random%20stuff/Astra...

Almost white, with a blush of pink:

http://i1072.photobucket.com/albums/w362/townsendia/random%20stuff/brt2_...

A wee little Townsendia spathulata from the Pryors, rabbit dropping in lower left indicates size:

http://i1072.photobucket.com/albums/w362/townsendia/random%20stuff/Tspat...

Escobaria vivipara, photo taken in the glaring sun:

http://i1072.photobucket.com/albums/w362/townsendia/random%20stuff/160_z...

Calochortus gunnisonii:

http://i1072.photobucket.com/albums/w362/townsendia/random%20stuff/085_z...

Longma
Longma's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-11-19

You really do post the most amazing pictures Brian.  8) 8) Inspirational,  :o ;D Thank you!

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Another awesome batch! boy, that Townsendia really is tiny!

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Really exiting pictures (and plants of course), Brian!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Brian_W
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-04-28
Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

Glorious photos Brian, Well done!! Give yourself a pat on the back for me!!

Pulsatilla patens the harbinger of spring on the Northern Great Plains!! Brings back lots of good memories!

Is Ipomopsis spicata biannual or perennial?

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

Brian_W
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-04-28

John,

From what I've observed, Ipomopsis spicata var. spicata is perennial and var. orchidacea is biannual.  Both are attractive plants, but I really like the long, tangled hairs on the stem and leaves of var. orchidacea.  

Brian

Pages

Log in or register to post comments