Re: Image of the day - 2013

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Mark McD
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Joined: 2009-12-14

Good question Cohan.  One the positive side, Allium thunbergii is very cold tolerant, not bothered by some degree of freezing temperature and even some snow, they'll go as long as they can. On the other side, I once had a form of Allium thunbergii, and a Himalayan species A. stracheyi, that could never successfully bloom here in New England, because they would try to flower in December.  I had both of these when I lived in mild Pacific Northwest (near Seattle Washington), and in that climate they did indeed bloom in December without problem, but here in New England, by December the ground is frozen and all plant activity is stopped.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Two views of the Seven Son Flower, a small Chinese tree, Heptacodium miconioides (syn. H. jaminoides), introduced to cultivation in North American by Arnold Arboretum (near Boston, Massachusetts), around the early 1900s.  It is very hardy and ornamental, flowering in September with clusters of small white flowers that are scented like jasmine or gardenia (drives the bees into a frenzy), but the real show is after the flowers, when the calyx lobes expand and turn a bright pink to red color.  The tree also has pale shredding bark, and handsome peach-tree-like leaves, a really good tree all around.

In this photo taken on October 5th, the transition where there are still white flower clusters and developing pink bracts.

 

Two photos of the bracts more fully expanded, the darker one on a drizzly day, Oct. 12. The bright one taken yesterday in sunshine, where the bracts seem to glow.

  

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

cohan
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Joined: 2011-02-03

I guess it would depend what cues are triggering flowering- day length, day/night temperatures, or number of days of growth!

Seven sons looks like a nice addition to the fall garden, atypical colour scheme for that season..

 

There are still some things flowering here, but they are definitely on borrowed time..

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

cohan
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A couple of views on the road yesterday...

 

 

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

deesen
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Joined: 2011-01-31

Biiiiiiiiiggggg skies there Cohen.

David Nicholson
in Devon, UK  Zone 9b

cohan
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Joined: 2011-02-03

Indeed, David- at least where there is cleared land- my property has trees all around, so we can only see the sky more or less straight up..lol

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

cohan
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Joined: 2011-02-03

Potentilla nitida with some  'lost label' semps; the seed batch of P nitida from several years ago has been interesting- plants are quite varied- in greener, more silvery, flatter, taller etc.. Still no flowers :( so i can't comment on those.. This is definitely the flattest of all, perhaps smaller leaves, that would require a closer look.. a bit of fall color on this one.. Oct 07

Potentilla nitida, Sempervivum

A different kind of (ex) Potentilla- Dasiphora fruticosa hybrid/cultivar..  I picked up a couple of these (different) late a couple of years back for $1.00 each, and although they are in a dry spot with rare supplemental watering, they have been doing well, if going slowly. I might still have the names around somewhere, if I can find the plastic nursery tags...lol This one is a very nice creamy palest yellow, the other is white.. We have a large typical yellow on the property,  and I still really want a pink flowered variety! Oct 07 some nice subtle fall colours too.

Dasiphora fruticosa  Dasiphora fruticosa

A more standard D fruticosa.. this seems taller and looser than modern cultivars, could be closer to wild forms, or its site which is sunny, but not all day.. this shot from Oct 13. all forms seem to flower well beyond frost...

Dasiphora fruticosa Dasiphora fruticosa

 

 

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Crocus speciosus:

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Cohan, I think my favorite is the smaller cream potentilla (I prefer that name!) and not the yellow one!

Nice Crocuses, Lori, autumn flowering crocuses often get damaged by the rain here!

 

Here is a nice plant still flowering. It has been flowering for several months now but only with 2-4 at the same time. It is a perennial here.

Impatiens arguta (I think).

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

cohan
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Joined: 2011-02-03

Trond, I agree- the natural bright yellow is nice, but I love that cream colour.. it should get to a decent size in time too- probably faster if I watered it, and I will try to next year, but the spot I have these (the cream, a white, and a Prunus tomentosa seedling) is a bit beyond my hoses, so I will have to carry water- or get more hose! I do make a point of throwing some extra snow on them in winter- they are only a few metres from the driveway, and they have a thick mulch to hold whatever moisture the do get, but the spot is by two old spruce trees, and at the 'high'/dry end of the property..

The Impatiens is nice, seems to have a bit of colour in the leaves too. I planted a few seedlings from my cousins place of one of the big invasive Impatiens, in my first year or so back, but I didn't choose the sites that well, and they didn't grow..lol

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

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