Re: Image of the day - 2013

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Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

I recall growing this one, Tim, and growing it in the sand bed where it did well.  The one I grew was unfortunately much paler in flower, and as a result, rather insignificant.  Glad to see one with better color.

deesen
deesen's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

Tim wrote:

This has to be the most beautiful of teucriums in flower - T. aroanum.

Just been doing a bit of research to try to source a plant and find that the sub-species name is actually aroanium.

For anyone in the UK Rob Potterton stocks it.

David Nicholson
in Devon, UK  Zone 9b

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

I grew Teucrium aroanium decades ago in my Seattle area garden, it was charming plant, even is rather pale flowered, almost a grey-lavender with deeper veining.  Googling around, I see some photos labeled as this species, with deep color flowers, but with much more linear green leaves, so probably some misidentified images out there.  Here's a few images from Denver Botanic Garden, click the small "images" link.
http://navigate.botanicgardens.org/weboi/oecgi2.exe/INET_ECM_DispPl?NAME...

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

Thanks fpr the link, Mark.  That looks like what I grew.  Good foliage but the flowers were such a delicate and pale color, it didn't make a "statement" in bloom.

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

This is not in the wild, but a wild corner of my garden! I grow 4 different types of Enkianthus, this is the showiest, Enkianthus campanulatus  var palibinii. Always a reliable bloomer.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Hoy wrote:

This is not in the wild, but a wild corner of my garden! I grow 4 different types of Enkianthus, this is the showiest, Enkianthus campanulatus  var palibinii. Always a reliable bloomer.

Very pretty.  Are the flowers stinky; whenever I've encountered Enkianthus in a botanic garden and given the flowers a whiff, I think "oh my, them's some stinky flowers".
;-)

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Mark, I have not noticed any bad smell! On the contrary I can discern a weak honey fragrance and the bumblebees are very fond of them.

Although this shrub doesn't stink either (not to my nose anyway) it has the bad habit of spreading vigorously by runners: Neillia thibetica. It is a nice filler in a shrubbery though and freely flowering in June.

Another shub in flower now is Rosa roxburghii f normalis - weeks later than most years.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

I've seen Neillia thibetica growing well at an arboterum (or sorts), the famous Mt. Auburn Cemetery near Boston, Massachusetts, so apparently it's hardy here.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Toole
Toole's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-07-02

Cyclamen coum close up .

 

Cheers Dave.

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Toole wrote:

Cyclamen coum close up .

 

Cheers Dave.

Nice! My cyclamens suffered badly last winter. Although most survived the flowering was sparse.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

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