Re: Got the Blues

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Booker
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Joined: 2010-01-30

Certainly on the purple side of blue this beautiful little Meconopsis delavayi is one of my absolute favourites.  It flowered back in june and has now disappeared back under the compost ... building itself up for an even better display next summer ... hopefully!  :D

Cliff Booker A.K.A. Ranunculus
On the moors in Lancashire, U.K.
Usually wet, often windy, sometimes cold ... and that's just me!

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

Beautiful plant, Cliff.
In bloom in the garden now in a trough - Oxytropis oreophila.  As the flowers fade they go through a period when they turn almost turquoise.  In our continued drought they are doing this in fast forward.

Boland
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Joined: 2009-09-25

Cliff, that Meconopsis has me drooling!

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

Hoy
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Joined: 2009-12-15

I have never thought of looking at the flowers from behind, Cliff, and certainly not imagined the beauty of the reverse of a flower.

Anne, Oxytropis oreophila is a plant to desire! When I was a student I tried to collect all the native Fabaceae in Norway (about 70-80) and have ever since had an eye for pea plants.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Booker
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Joined: 2010-01-30

Thanks folks,
Here is an image from a previous season ... from the front ...

MECONOPSIS DELAVAYI

Cliff Booker A.K.A. Ranunculus
On the moors in Lancashire, U.K.
Usually wet, often windy, sometimes cold ... and that's just me!

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

Hoy wrote:

I have never thought of looking at the flowers from behind, Cliff, and certainly not imagined the beauty of the reverse of a flower.

Anne, Oxytropis oreophila is a plant to desire! When I was a student I tried to collect all the native Fabaceae in Norway (about 70-80) and have ever since had an eye for pea plants.

/ Trond, I'd love to hear which of the peas you collected were the best candidates for the rock garden.  I grow as many peas as I can, and many of them are wonderful in the garden when some attention is paid to their requirements.

Sellars
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Joined: 2009-12-29

Here's something in bloom today in the garden.

Campanula scheuchzeri is easy to grow from seed and not fussy in the garden.  I have had trouble with other Campanulas mostly from slugs but this one seems slug-proof.  And it keeps on flowering!

David Sellars
From the Wet Coast of British Columbia, Canada

Feature your favourite hikes at:
www.mountainflora.ca
MountainFlora videos:
http://www.youtube.com/user/MountainFlora

Hoy
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Joined: 2009-12-15

Spiegel wrote:

Trond, I'd love to hear which of the peas you collected were the best candidates for the rock garden.  I grow as many peas as I can, and many of them are wonderful in the garden when some attention is paid to their requirements.

I do not think it is many of the Norwegian pea plants which are usable as rock garden plants. Most of them are too big and/or too lax. Few, if any, are endemic her. I think many are circumpolar.
Sorry, I have no pictures of these plants.

The best , in my opinion, are
- Astragalus alpinus. Some forms are quite good.
- Astragalus norvegicus.
- Oxytropis lapponica. Tolerates dry conditions better than the previous.
- Oxytropis deflexa norvegica.
- Oxytropis campestris sordida. The last two are rare in Norway.
- Lotus corniculatus. Some forms are very floriferous and good rock plants.

For the moment I only grow Astragalus alpinus and Lotus corniculatus at our cabin.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Boland
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Joined: 2009-09-25

Nice campanula David...the saxes in the tufa are even nicer!  Never heard of that Campanula species...I do have the Phyteuma counterpart.  Only campanula still open here are a few rotundifolia and carpatica.

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

Sellars
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-29

Todd:

We have seen Campanula scheuchzeri in the Alps and Pyrenees.  It is like C. rotundifolia except it is smaller and the leaves are narrow.  Here is one growing on a limestone boulder in the Pyrenees

David Sellars
From the Wet Coast of British Columbia, Canada

Feature your favourite hikes at:
www.mountainflora.ca
MountainFlora videos:
http://www.youtube.com/user/MountainFlora

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