Re: Got the Blues

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Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Yes, isn't it incredible?? 
Anyone who has not yet followed Cliff's link to gaze in awe at Anne's stunningly beautiful garden, you can't imagine what you are missing!  :)

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Boland
Boland's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

Unreal garden!

BTW, nice article Trond!

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

I finally figured out what article you are referring to, Todd!  ???
http://www.bnargs.org/NewsPDFs/2010August.pdf

See link above for some very interesting reading, including terrific articles by both Cliff and Trond! 

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Thanks, Todd and Lori.

I am glad nobody has been to Anne's garden (excellent described by Cliff) first and mine afterwards. They are different worlds and mine is the wild jungle.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Join the club, Trond!   (Except any jungle, I trust, would be vastly more interesting than my yard, needless to say...  :()

... Which, nonetheless, brings up an interesting point... When one has the opportunity to visit more than one garden, it is worth putting some thought into the order of visits.  Satisfaction is maximized if each builds on the previous, with the finest saved for last!  Argue it if you wish, but the logic is irrefutable!  ;D

Some more blues... Gentiana paradoxa:

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Both are excellent articles, Trond and Cliff!  I do get email copies of the many (maybe most?) of the NARGS Chapter newsletters, including Berkshire's, but I admit I hardly ever have time to read them all.  I think it is very advantageous that chapter editors exchange newsletters.  They get many ideas from each other that each builds on in their own way.  Our Minnesota editor offers to forward copies (of other Chapters' newsletters) that she receives to members who wish them. 

Let me say how truly wonderful it is to host any chapter speakers, from the NARGS speaker tour or otherwise.  Here, chapter members seem to be a bit hesitant to host, thinking they are not "worthy," or just not realizing the great opportunity they are missing.  I keep encouraging them, and I want to encourage any readers here, too.  The wealth of information and experience that guests hold simply pores out in torrents.  You need only open the gate.  I have very fond memories of each of my hostings, and feel a little greedy that I am among the five or so of us that seem to alternate getting the prize.  Let me also emphasize that having a nice garden is not a prerequisite!  With my first hosting, I only owned a dozen or so alpines at most! 

I would expect in some chapters, there is a healthy competition between members, for the honor and privilege of hosting.  Indeed, a contest worth winning!

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Skulski wrote:

Join the club, Trond!   (Except any jungle, I trust, would be vastly more interesting than my yard, needless to say...  :()

... Which, nonetheless, brings up an interesting point... When one has the opportunity to visit more than one garden, it is worth putting some thought into the order of visits.  Satisfaction is maximized if each builds on the previous, with the finest saved for last!  Argue it if you wish, but the logic is irrefutable!  ;D

Some more blues... Gentiana paradoxa:

Where's the paradox?

I agree with you Lori, but if you are more than one person paying visits, then you can have more than one opinion! What one person  think is perfect, the other(s) not necessarily agree to.

Many thanks, Rick.

I fully support your message regarding hosting speakers. I have done so a few times myself.

It's the same when it comes to garden visits. A lot of people think that their gardens don't qualify but they forget that most people have quite ordinary gardens and would enjoy looking at similar ones. It shines through if you tend your garden with care and love although you don't have the rarest plants.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Hoy wrote:

Where's the paradox?

Oops, sorry - here it is:
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:The_pair_of_ducks.jpg

;D ;D ;D

But, seriously, I have no idea what is paradoxical about G. paradoxa.   ???

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

Hoy wrote:

Skulski wrote:

Join the club, Trond!   (Except any jungle, I trust, would be vastly more interesting than my yard, needless to say...  :()

... Which, nonetheless, brings up an interesting point... When one has the opportunity to visit more than one garden, it is worth putting some thought into the order of visits.  Satisfaction is maximized if each builds on the previous, with the finest saved for last!  Argue it if you wish, but the logic is irrefutable!  ;D

Some more blues... Gentiana paradoxa:

Where's the paradox?

I agree with you Lori, but if you are more than one person paying visits, then you can have more than one opinion! What one person  think is perfect, the other(s) not necessarily agree to.

Many thanks, Rick.

I fully support your message regarding hosting speakers. I have done so a few times myself.

It's the same when it comes to garden visits. A lot of people think that their gardens don't qualify but they forget that most people have quite ordinary gardens and would enjoy looking at similar ones. It shines through if you tend your garden with care and love although you don't have the rarest plants.

/Somewhere I once read a well-known garden writer saying that any loved and well-tended garden is beautiful.  I tend to agree because people's perceptions are incredibly varied.  What's beautiful to one is boring to another etc... I might personally make an exception for garden gnomes but I know there are people who absolutely love them.

Booker
Booker's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-30

Very pretty little Himalayan annual ...

GENTIANA SYRINGEA

Cliff Booker A.K.A. Ranunculus
On the moors in Lancashire, U.K.
Usually wet, often windy, sometimes cold ... and that's just me!

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