Re: Got the Blues

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Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

Skulski wrote:

Anne, on that note... and if you don't mind me asking... and diverting for a moment from the subject at hand...

I was asked a while back by an extremely accomplished local alpine gardener to inquire as to what conditions are required for growing Chesneya (formerly Gueldenstaedtia) to beyond the first leaf stage, or preferably, to flowering?

Would you happen to have any advice?

Lori, I got 100% germination from the Chesnya seed I received from the ACE expedition. The seeds were quite large and of course very hard. I recall using an exacto knife on them! Sounds harsh but it worked and I had large, healthy seedlings. Then we had a long drought period and I was unable to water my seedlings. They all died before I could actually get them into the garden. I  believe these are high scree plants and would probably like your conditions better than mine. The flowers are large and gorgeous but considering where they come from they would probably prefer a cooler summer and moisture. It would be worth any effort to get them growing and I hope you'll try.

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Enough talk! I have to post a plant although it is not the bluest. Prunella grandiflora tolerates both dry and moist situations. Here it is in my seminatural rock bed. Not native to Norway but you find it in Sweden.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Boland
Boland's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

Thanks for clearing up the ACE situation Cliff and Anne.  I was obviously fuzzy on the details...all I really knew is that the seeds came from China!

Back to blues, here is my Iris chrysographes 'Dark Form' X I. bulleyana (from ACE)...Mark, you can see they are floriferous in my cool climate!

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

Kelaidis
Kelaidis's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-03

Looks a bit like Iris delavayi too...

For every minion of the peaks there are a dozen steppe children growing in the dry Continental heart of all hemispheres still unknown to horticulture.

Boland
Boland's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

Maybe I've proven delavayi is a hybrid! I know they think bulleyana might be.  They are a messed up group between chrysographes, delavayi and bulleyana....at least clarkeiis distincy...as for wilsonii vs. forrestii....another conundrum.

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

More yet...
1) Baptisia australis... well, it looked blue outside but purple in the picture!
2, 3) Dracocephalum ruyschiana

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

The Baptisia looks blue for me! I have tried it but not succeeded. Dracocephalum ruyschiana is a native of Norway but I have never seen it in the wild.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Two blue here. Geranium 'Rozanne' never seeds but flower nonstop for months! The other is a biennial, Jasione montana, extremely tolerant of dry acidic soil.
Mark, do you find the onion in the first picture?

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Hoy wrote:

Mark, do you find the onion in the first picture?

Didn't notice the onion at first, but I believe I see the little pink few-flowered Allium mairei (syn. A. amabile) just starting to flower.  Watch out, this tiny allium is easily swamped by larger plants, even handsome blue ones ;)

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

McDonough wrote:

Didn't notice the onion at first, but I believe I see the little pink few-flowered Allium mairei (syn. A. amabile) just starting to flower.  Watch out, this tiny allium is easily swamped by larger plants, even handsome blue ones ;)

Thanks, Mark. I had completely forgotten both the plant and its name till I noticed the clump when I took the picture. Mistook it from grass at first. I will look after it now!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

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