Re: Got the Blues

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Booker
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Joined: 2010-01-30

A much better blue than the Meconopsis delavayi is this gorgeous little Aquilegia from the Dolomites.

AQUILEGIA EINSEINIANA

Cliff Booker A.K.A. Ranunculus
On the moors in Lancashire, U.K.
Usually wet, often windy, sometimes cold ... and that's just me!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Booker wrote:

A much better blue than the Meconopsis delavayi is this gorgeous little Aquilegia from the Dolomites.

AQUILEGIA EINSEINIANA

I grew this many many years ago, when I was in college... the seed from a wild source so I believe it was correct.  It was a very cute little plant.  I suspect that most seed in the various seedexes will not come true, as they all freely hybridize in the garden, so would look to find a wild collected seed offering again.  Cliff, if I may offer a name correction, I believe the species name is Aquilegia einseleana Fr.Schultz.  How tall is your plant, did you get seed from a wild source?

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

David wrote:

Todd:

We have seen Campanula scheuchzeri in the Alps and Pyrenees.  It is like C. rotundifolia except it is smaller and the leaves are narrow.  Here is one growing on a limestone boulder in the Pyrenees

Beautiful plant in an austere setting! Just checked IPNI.ORG, and see that there are many subspecies as well.
http://www.ipni.org/ipni/advPlantNameSearch.do;jsessionid=08E89598A751E5...

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Booker
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Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-30

McDonough wrote:

Booker wrote:

A much better blue than the Meconopsis delavayi is this gorgeous little Aquilegia from the Dolomites.

AQUILEGIA EINSELEANA

How tall is your plant, did you get seed from a wild source?

Sorry Mark, I must have given you the wrong impression.  The image was captured at Pragser Wildersee in the Dolomites (in July) and I don't actually grow this one ... but would like to!  There were quite a number of plants ranging from three inches high in cliff crevices to nine inches high in the open woods around the lake.  Your name correction is appreciated and has been amended above.
Another image ...

Cliff Booker A.K.A. Ranunculus
On the moors in Lancashire, U.K.
Usually wet, often windy, sometimes cold ... and that's just me!

Hoy
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Joined: 2009-12-15

Pretty blue, this one. Is it as blue as the bluest gentians?

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Booker
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Joined: 2010-01-30

It is a very good blue Trond, but certainly can't compare to say Gentiana verna.

Cliff Booker A.K.A. Ranunculus
On the moors in Lancashire, U.K.
Usually wet, often windy, sometimes cold ... and that's just me!

Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

No,I thought so, Cliff. But Aquilegia einseleana is a good one.

Not many blue flowers here, the best at this time is Hydrangea serrulata which flowers from July and onwards.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

harold peachey
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Joined: 2010-03-22

The prettiest wildflower in these parts
Gentianopsis crinita

Harold Peachey
USDA Z5, Onondaga, NY US

Booker
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Joined: 2010-01-30

Oh my, Harold ... that is a gem!

Cliff Booker A.K.A. Ranunculus
On the moors in Lancashire, U.K.
Usually wet, often windy, sometimes cold ... and that's just me!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Peachey wrote:

The prettiest wildflower in these parts
Gentianopsis crinita

Harold, superb photo!  Is this growing nearby someplace in upper state New York, or in your garden?  There is a small nature preserve nearby in town, right on the New Hampshire border, where this beautiful biennial can be viewed in moist meadows.  I wonder if it is flowering this year given our localized drought in this area.  Some sites still list it as Gentiana crinita, so look for it under that name too.  In New Hampshire, as in several other states, the Fringed Gentian on State Threatened plant lists.

Some links:

USDA Plant Profile page for Gentianopsis crinita
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=GECR2

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gentiana_crinita

Good photos here at Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center
http://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=GECR2

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

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