Re: Alpines August 2012

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RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

I looked up Plantago media, as I thought it might be a worthy garden plant, too.  But it is already introduced in America, and seems to be marching through the United States and Canada on its own.  I wouldn't want to add to that!  Plantago urvillei, on the other hand, I would expect to be more behaved, at least in my climate.  A very cute species!

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Campanula zoysii is looking delightful on a deep gritty raised bed at the moment. We have had an unusually wet and cool summer on and off and this may have led to a second flush of flowering. Gives me hope to try some of the choice Rocky Mountain species.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Nice, Tim!  That's one I've never succeeded with... killed the plants I've bought and never managed to germinate seeds either.  And a second flush of flowering yet!  :)

Crepis pygmaea, from seed this past winter, has put out another bloom...

Here's a shot of our native Crepis nana, for comparison:

Is this Gentiana paradoxa?  That's what I show on the map, but I've moved this plant around a couple times and may have got mixed up.  I'm not sure the foliage is narrow enough for G. paradoxa.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Tim, Campanula zoysii is a gem! Did you cut it down after the first flowering?

Lori, Crepis nana is as gardenworthy as C pygmaea in my opinion! And they both are better than any Crepis found native here!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Very nice flowers on the Plantago, Lori! Always love to see Crepis nana too :)
Tim, that would be a great show of flowers for round one!

Speaking of Saxifraga, I have some of this year's seed to sow- should I plant them now or wait for fall for stratification, or spring for warm germination?

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

cohan wrote:

Speaking of Saxifraga, I have some of this year's seed to sow- should I plant them now or wait for fall for stratification, or spring for warm germination?

I'm sure no expert but it seems to me that the ones I've tried, or looked up, have seemed to require cold stratification, so I would tend to wait until later (if you're leaving them outside) or I would stratify them indoors.  I hope those with more experience will comment!

Lactuca intricata seems to mostly be producing one flower at a time (loads of buds though), but at least I caught 3 open today!  (From seed this past winter):
 

These teensy Primula scotica on the shadier side of the tufa garden are now in bloom; I'm a little surprised how well they take the drier conditions here.

Cancrinia tianshanica, from seed this past winter, with a bud:

Erysimum leptophyllum, from seed this past winter.  (I appreciate seeing some bloom, no matter how modest, in the event they don't winter over! )

An old bedraggled Antirrhinum molle(? - every time I refer to this, I probably call it something different so please tell me if you know what its proper name is), very woody and declining (the survivor of two plants I bought in 2001 - amazing hardiness!):

Cyclamen purpurascens, again:
 

Gentiana septemfida:

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

deesen
deesen's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

You seem to be having a good season Lori, I'm having a stinker.

David Nicholson
in Devon, UK  Zone 9b

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Due to the weather still, I assume, David?  What a bummer - summer is so short in the northern latitudes that one can't help but feel a bit cheated if conditions are poor! 

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Lori, your Antirrhinum seems to have ob-opposite leaves.  I wouldn't have a clue, but might that help with an identification?

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Hmm, very observant, Rick.  I can compare them to this year's seedlings of A. molle.  The flower colour (yellow throat, purple guidelines on upper petal) seem to match A. molle (from googling) but I don't have detailed descriptions of Antirrhinum species to compare.

Edit: ... and the old plant does seem to match the seedlings in that respect.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

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