Pulsatilla patens

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RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

I just couldn't stop taking photos...

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Lucky you! My local "pasque flowers" (mogop, P. vernalis) here in the Norwegian mountains are still covered with 2-3' of snow. They will not flower until early May when the spring gets hold here.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

RickR wrote:

I just couldn't stop taking photos...

Great photos Rick, those fuzzy profiles are fantastic.  You know, too often I take for granted a plant species, and I didn't realize where this plant was native to, the USDA Map was a bit of a shocker for me; didn't realize Pulsatilla patens had such a broad range, from Alaska to Texas.  Interesting that it has the common name "eastern pasqueflower" when it seems mostly a western species, although extends eastward as far as Michigan and Ontario.

USDA Map:
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=PUPA5

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Agreed.  There are usually lots of niches well into the east where a prairie plant might grow, even though there are no prairies.  In the northern Minnesota coniferous forests of the BWCA along the Canadian border, I find lots of indigenous "prairie" plants.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Boland
Boland's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

Rick, you are having a much earlier spring than last year...the most we saw was snowdrops!  My Pulsatilla are all under snow still.  I seem to be so far behind everyone.

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

That's right, Todd.  I recall how you have always started your springs before me, but then I always catch up, since my spring is much abbreviated.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Don't be sad, Todd! Where I am now it is still 2-3 feet of snow and we had 5" more yesterday. All my plants here are covered and they will not surface before late April! On our way here we drove through Oslo and my mums garden is still covered by one foot of snow. Although the spring starts early at home where I live it is not like that in all Norway!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Here are more Pulsatilla patens, from my bike ride home through the uplands along the Bow River the other day.  I was rather surprised to see so many still in bloom, as when I'd gone out to look at them on April 4th, it looked as though they were almost done blooming in this area.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Boland
Boland's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

Ah Lori, I miss that scene...most years when I've been in Calgary, I arrive in late April just in time to see this display.

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

Kelaidis
Kelaidis's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-03

It's a bit early to expect Pulsatilla patens to be out many places in its range: we have found this wonderful plant to be challenging in our gardens thus far: I believe it is very sensitive to overwatering. Strange that we can grow hundreds of cacti, calochorti, no end of agaves and other xerophytes, and it's our native pulsatilla I invariably kill first...I think it will have to grow in a shady, unwatered garden for us.

But it has an almost identical cousin that I have enjoyed for years: it came to me as Pulsatilla "taurica var. halleri" and may or may not be true halleri. But it looks remarkably like our native Pulsatilla but grows with ease in our rock garden and goes from strength to strength...

I especially enjoy the new buds emerging in the spring...

Aaaah! Spring! Will it ever come? (My friends in San Francisco taunt me with all their talk of Magnolias and mumes and what not.....grrrrr)

For every minion of the peaks there are a dozen steppe children growing in the dry Continental heart of all hemispheres still unknown to horticulture.

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