Pulsatilla 2012

17 posts / 0 new
Last post
cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Interesting observations, Rick- so what soils have you found to enhance longevity?

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

I've not tested like Rick, but the native Pulsatillas always grow in lean soil. The one I am most familiar with (P. vernalis) often grows in sandy sediments, moraine soil or crevices in the rocks. I've never dug any older plants as they have an extensive root system but seedlings transplant well.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

One spot I was thinking of trying some is a half sunny spot in front of spruce trees that is quite dry.... should have no drainage issues there.. not sure which species yet- have to see what seedlings I have...

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

The native Pulsatilla patens here in Minnesota that I have seen grow in very sandy soil.  Even sand dunes stabilized in just the last century or so. 

I have a red P. vulgaris in a sunny part of a "woodland" garden (rich clay soil).  The second year it had a bloom.  Third year three blooms. Fourth year five blooms. Now the fifth year it's back to one bloom and I expect it to croak.  Last season it was almost 2ft.  Now it is 10 inches.  Compare that to a vulgaris I have in a very well drained sandy moderate garden soil that I have had for ten years.  Admittedly, it doesn't bloom as well as it used to, but it still gets a dozen or so flowers.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

P. patens grows across the prairies in alkaline clay from the grasslands to the mixed forest and beyond, and up into the montane zone... not alpine here though.

cohan wrote:

That's why I was wondering about the Pulsatillas- some of them are alpines  ;D

Yes, what I said was "the alpines that need it" get alpine bed conditions... haven't found that pulsatillas do here.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Lori wrote:

P. patens grows across the prairies in alkaline clay from the grasslands to the mixed forest and beyond, and up into the montane zone... not alpine here though.

cohan wrote:

That's why I was wondering about the Pulsatillas- some of them are alpines   ;D

Yes, what I said was "the alpines that need it" get alpine bed conditions... haven't found that pulsatillas do here.

Yeah, the range of patens is extensive- everywhere except here, it seems...lol
Any observations of short lived plants, like Rick? But maybe you don't have any heavier soil conditions? I think I need to consider siting and drainage a lot more than you do in Calgary, drier naturally and in the city besides...

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Pages

Log in or register to post comments