Penstemon 2012

15 posts / 0 new
Last post
RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21
Penstemon 2012

Always a good show in my garden, but this season the best ever: Penstemon cobaea:

Penstemon hirsutus var. pygmaeus

A chance hybrid between the two:

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Impressive, Rick!
Last year I sowed some penstemons and planted out at my summerhouse. No I am looking forward to see what kind of flowers they have as they were obviously not what the labels said :-\

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Very beautiful, Rick!  
Some of the other penstemons are starting to bloom here, following P.nitidus, which is always the earliest.
P. x barbatus(?):
 

P. secundiflorus:
 

Penstemon confertus:

And the "P. alluviorum" I grew from NARGS 2010 seed last year turned out to be... let's see now, what do misidentified penstemon seeds always turn out to be?  You guessed it... P. hirsutus!   I'm baffled at how often this happens, and that it's always the same imposter!   ???

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Lori wrote:

And the "P. alluviorum" I grew from NARGS 2010 seed last year turned out to be... let's see now, what do misidentified penstemon seeds always turn out to be?  You guessed it... P. hirsutus!   I'm baffled at how often this happens, and that it's always the same imposter!   ???
[attachthumb=6]

It is baffling isn't it, that so many Penstemon species in the seedexes turn out to be P. hirsutus, but even moreso with the Eastern USA species, because they're closer to looking similar.  Really like the P. secundiflorus, the shape and declined position of the flowers is most pleasing.

Rick, P. cobaea is awesome, but I'm thrilled to see a hybrid between it and hirsutus.  You should try growing on some seedlings from that hybrid to see what develops.

My shambles of an Allium garden (lost weed control over it last year, this year I can barely look at it, plus still no time for such a major garden overhaul) has some non-Allium plants for added color; and Penstemon hirsutus (regular tall forms) becoming a weed itself.  It made quite a show in May, among the spikes of weedy invading grass, in all colors from lavender, bluish, white, and my favorite, clear pinks. Flowering now is is Penstemon barbatus, I like this one very much.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

McDonough wrote:

Rick, P. cobaea is awesome, but I'm thrilled to see a hybrid between it and hirsutus.  You should try growing on some seedlings from that hybrid to see what develops.

In fact I have been wanting to do just that.  The first bloom was so little I didn't allow seed to develop.  The next two seasons the weather didn't cooperate, and it looked like the plant might be short lived because it seemed to be waning.  But it has come back better than ever now, and it looks as though I will have good seed set. ;D

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Seems I have to look out for red Penstemons!

This year I have to different species (or hybrids) flowering - sorry, no names :-\

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

I'm curious Trond, how is it that you get so many plants without any names, even if wrong names?  Were they just offered up as Penstemon sp.?

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

McDonough wrote:

I'm curious Trond, how is it that you get so many plants without any names, even if wrong names?  Were there just offered up as Penstemon sp.?

Well, Mark, to tell the truth if you haven't guessed already: I am lazy!

Most seeds I get have names of course although some are wrong. Regarding the penstemons I sowed several species and they all had names but the seedlings looked very similar and as you see it's only two different ones.
However, I always use labels when I plant seeds but they usually disappear when I prick out the seedlings as I don't bother labelling all the plants. Finally when I place the plants outside the last labels disappear! When I was younger this didn't matter as I could recall almost all the Latin names. Not so anymore :-\

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Hoy wrote:

I always use labels when I plant seeds but they usually disappear when I prick out the seedlings as I don't bother labelling all the plants. Finally when I place the plants outside the last labels disappear! When I was younger this didn't matter as I could recall almost all the Latin names. Not so anymore :-\

One thing I've been doing in the last few years, is double-labeling plants, one label in front and one in back of anything I plant.  If I plant out a "block" of seedlings, I use 4 labels, one in each corner of a rectangular grouping of seedlings.  I have to label plants because like you, I cannot depend on my memory anymore.  ;)

Both penstemons you show are very attractive, I hope someone can suggest an ID for them.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Penstemon procerus:

Various self-seeded Penstemon x barbatus:
   

Penstemon lyallii:

Penstemon whippleanus:

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Somehow I missed this! Beautiful collection you have, Lori!

Mark, I am too lazy to make all those labels! And the thrushes and magpies pick everything anyway . . . . . I had to bury the labels :-\

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Pages

Log in or register to post comments