other cactus

85 posts / 0 new
Last post
Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Weiser wrote:

Thought you may like this Opuntia. :)
This is Opuntia macrocentra and is hardy for me but I have it placed near my south foundation. It will get frost damage if exposed to long stretches of sub 10F temperatures
I love the long spines, black with white tips, and the purple colored pads in the winter.

You are quite right, John!

Are bicoloured specimens/species common or rare BTW?

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

Trond
Some of the differant clones of the Opuntia phaeacantha complex can display the same type of yellow and red bi-colored flowers.

In my experience you are more apt to find it occurring in non Opuntia species. Such as these Photos of the Echinocereus complex.

But there are many other cacti genera that show bi-colored flowers. I don't grow them due to lack of hardiness.

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

DesertZone
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-08-20

Here's one of the few I had, they did good but rotted under heavy snow fall one year or was it very cold? I think it was heavy snow. :rolleyes:
I was looking around and have a seedling/small plant from the one in the pic, could be hybrid? Does well in cold.  I will try and get a pic and post. 

PS I have lots of these on my place in AZ.  I did not know they were there untill I went down in the drought.  They grow right in the middle of dense bushes, probably for protection from collared peccaries.

Dry garden, little irrigation, 9" precip

Shoshone Idaho USA. Zone 5b-6a

Hot and dry in the summer, cold and snow in the winter.

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Weiser wrote:

Trond
Some of the differant clones of the Opuntia phaeacantha complex can display the same type of yellow and red bi-colored flowers.

In my experience you are more apt to find it occurring in non Opuntia species. Such as these Photos of the Echinocereus complex.

But there are many other cacti genera that show bi-colored flowers. I don't grow them due to lack of hardiness.

John, I've seen pictures of some but never seen pictures of any bicoloured here.

This one (yours) takes the prize:

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

DesertZone
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-08-20

Opuntia macrocentra/polyacantha cross, found two in the yard. both found very close were my old macrocantha grew. :-\
Only opuntia I have with long spines like these.
first one.

And the one I found yesterday after looking by the old plants.

Dry garden, little irrigation, 9" precip

Shoshone Idaho USA. Zone 5b-6a

Hot and dry in the summer, cold and snow in the winter.

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

RickR wrote:

I tried germinating Maihuenia poeppigii this past season.  The best info I could find was to try it at 70+ F.  I planted it along with my Echinocereus seeds the first week of July.  The Echino seeds sprouted nicely, but no Maihuenia.

Any hints? (Of course, seed pots are always held over for at least one more season.)

There are some online articles, which I might be able to find links to if pressed...lol Several months cold stratification is recommended by one study ( if I remember right, 3 months was better than one in the study).. I can attest to reasonable success from that strategy.. aging likely also, as Bob mentions... I have some seed several years old I may try.. another suggestion is GA3, and there is another (for me too complicated) approach that involves high temperatures , and those seeds which do not germinate quickly are then pierced .....

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Hoy wrote:

Martin wrote:

DesertZone wrote:

Martin wrote:

Trond, cylindropuntias are the tall cacti for our climate. In the unheated greenhouse I have had them to 180 cm.

That might be a good cactus for over there.  I know Cylindropuntia imbricata can handle wet feet here in the winter.  I bet if it was high on a mound it would do ok, and if it had some heat for growth in the summer. :)

The challenge for the plants are not the winters, its the cool summers. They simply like it warmer during their growth periode than what we can expect here...

Yes, quite so but I'm willing to try ;D

Same issue here, plus much colder winters than you have, though less wet...lol.. I've started my first cactus area, which is in a 'warm' microclimate on the property- southern exposure, fence behind, trees behind that,  and another fence on west side, so it tends to be sheltered, warmer and drier than surrounding areas; so far a number of pots of seedlings sunk for the winter and one large pot with native O fragilis (which should not have any problems, its Echinocereus that will be tricky).. I'll also be using dark rocks to draw more warmth .. the possible drawback of this site/arrangement is that it retains less snowcover- so I shovelled more on them once there was enough around... they need all the help they can get once it gets to -30/-40.. experiments and observations yet to come!
I hope to try some sort of 'chollas' as well, a couple have been suggested as possibly hardy enough...

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

The shrunken Echinocereus spp. seedlings are spending a second winter in the fridge before braving my winters outside.

             

       

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

RickR wrote:

The shrunken Echinocereus spp. seedlings are spending a second winter in the fridge before braving my winters outside.

Baby cacti seedlings are just soooOOOO cute. Rick, how do you handle them in the fridge?  Don't they need more light? I'm interested in particular details about how you overwinter them in the fridge... and might such a technique be applicable to other plants?

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

McDonough wrote:

RickR wrote:

The shrunken Echinocereus spp. seedlings are spending a second winter in the fridge before braving my winters outside.

Baby cacti seedlings are just soooOOOO cute. Rick, how do you handle them in the fridge?  Don't they need more light? I'm interested in particular details about how you overwinter them in the fridge... and might such a technique be applicable to other plants?

While dormant, cacti do not need light, you just have to be careful re-acclimating them in spring; some people grow tender spp outdoors and winter plants in dark basements--just make sure they are dormant- cool/cold and dry for a while before...
No basement and no extra fridge space here, so my seedlings only got one winter indoors, we'll see what has survived by spring! I won't cry too much if the Echinocereus seedlings don't survive (not that I'll give up after one try)- my favourite plants and flowers for hardy cacti are Escobarias (esp missouriensis) and Pediocactus!

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Pages

Log in or register to post comments