Oenothera ID

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Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14
Oenothera ID

I was given this little "evening primrose", an Oenothera species, by gardening friend Marsha Russell who lives nearby. It is rather different than most Oenothera, starting out with the typical rosettes, but then springing with stiff woody stems to about 12", with small cauline leaves along the length, some larger leaves near the top, and sprouting very small bright yellow flowers all summer long.

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Just wondering if Calylophus might be a possibility?  Not sure how likely this is...  I think recall reading that one of the two (Oenothera and Calylophus, I mean) has a 3-part style while the other has a 4-part style... ?

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Skulski wrote:

Just wondering if Calylophus might be a possibility?  Not sure how likely this is...  I think recall reading that one of the two (Oenothera and Calylophus, I mean) has a 3-part style while the other has a 4-part style... ?

Species of Oenothera seem to float in and out of both Calylophus and Camissonia, and several other genera, so they're all possibilities.  In a few minutes search, I haven't found a good up-to-date online resource to delineate differences between the "genera", or a good breakdown of the genera in Onagraceae.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Allison
Allison's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-04-08

McDonough wrote:

Skulski wrote:

Species of Oenothera seem to float in and out of both Calylophus and Camissonia, and several other genera, so they're all possibilities.  In a few minutes search, I haven't found a good up-to-date online resource to delineate differences between the "genera", or a good breakdown of the genera in Onagraceae.

Maybe this is too simple but your plant looks just like the O. perennis that grows naturally in Eastern Ontario. Could it be that?

Gardening on a wooded rocky ridge in the Ottawa Valley, Canada. Cold winters (-30C) and hot, humid summers. Nuts about native plants, ferns, pottery, my family, and Border Collies.

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Lis wrote:

Maybe this is too simple but your plant looks just like the O. perennis that grows naturally in Eastern Ontario. Could it be that?

Thanks Lis, I think maybe that's it, there are lots and lots of web pages and photos on O. perennis, and they look similar to my plant.  Thanks for the suggestion. :D

http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=OEPE

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

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