Miscellaneous Woodlanders

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WimB
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

McDonough wrote:

Wim, are the flowers bad smelling, to earn their name?

They have a very typical smell indeed, a bit like a dog which hasn't been washed in ages and just ran trough the rain. I've heard the smell can be very strong if grown in a greenhouse and if you have large groups of them in your garden. Here I have to lean in very close to smell it, which I don't do very often...wet dog is not my favorite smell  ;D ;)

RickR wrote:

That Scoliopus is a beaut.  Kinda has a funny distribution:
http://www.efloras.org/object_page.aspx?object_id=8123&flora_id=1
Is that because of the mountain rain shadows?

Rick,

the distribution pattern of Scoliopus hallii is weird indeed (quite border-bound for a plant  ???)...I'm curious about that too?

Edit by Wim: It only grows to an elevation of 800 m, so I guess the white spot in the middle of the distribution pattern is where the Cascade Mountains are higher than 800 m?

Wim Boens
Wingene Belgium zone 8a

IMYoung
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-31

We have lots of this plant around the garden, all raised from seed, and we are rarely without out a flower from late December until early May. Despite what has been written about it not producing seeds in cultivation ( for instance in Alf Evans book, 'the Peat Garden') we have always had good seed set on our plants.
This year the flowers are later and are only just beginning.

We grow Scoliopus bigelovii and S. hallii .  We love them both but you could be thought crazy for wanting them as they are curious little flowers, especially hallii, that you could easily walk past and never see.


Scoliopus bigelovii and S. hallii

Both of these are growing in fish box troughs but we also have them growing and self seeding in the open garden. The secret of keeping them growing is never let them dry out or get too hot in the summer, they do not like it.

The bigelovii has lovely spotted leaves while the foliage is young though the spots fade as the foliage matures. S. hallii has plain, brighter green leaves.
The hallii flowers are at most 15mm across... just adorable little things.
The smell is not one you'd want to be cooped up with, but it can be quite pleasant if all you get is a quick whiff in passing!  ;D ;D
The veining and marking o nthe slightly larger bigelovii flowers is really gorgeous.
These guys are real favourites of mine!

Here are a couple of other Bulb Log Links about Scoliopus...

http://www.srgc.org.uk/bulblog/190303/log.html
http://www.srgc.org.uk/bulblog/log2005/010205/log.html


Two pix of S. bigelovii

Of course, they are named for Mr Bigelow, so the "v" is a twist.
http://www.marin.edu/cnps/Bigelow.html

Maggi

Edit: oops , didn't add the second pic as a thumbnail! Fixed now... click to enlarge!)

Ian  and/or Margaret Young ( -here it is usually Margaret)

Aberdeen , North East Scotland, UK
Zone 8a

www.srgc.net

Boland
Boland's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

On close examination, the flowers are quite exquisite!

If the distribution is below 800m, I expect the hardiness rating is not too high, but then Vancouveria is rated zone 6-7 and Lori has it in Calgary (zone 3) so who knows the ultimate hardiness of Scoliopis.

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

IMYoung wrote:

We have lots of this plant around the garden, all raised from seed, and we are rarely without out a flower from late December until early May. Despite what has been written about it not producing seeds in cultivation ( for instance in Alf Evans book, 'the Peat Garden') we have always had good seed set on our plants.
This year the flowers are later and are only just beginning.

We grow Scoliopus bigelovii and S. hallii .  We love them both but you could be thought crazy for wanting them as they are curious little flowers, especially hallii, that you could easily walk past and never see.

Scoliopus bigelovii and S. hallii

Both of these are growing in fish box troughs but we also have them growing and self seeding in the open garden. The secret of keeping them growing is never let them dry out or get too hot in the summer, they do not like it.

The bigelovii has lovely spotted leaves while the foliage is young though the spots fade as the foliage matures. S. hallii has plain, brighter green leaves.
The hallii flowers are at most 15mm across... just adorable little things.
The smell is not one you'd want to be cooped up with, but it can be quite pleasant if all you get is a quick whiff in passing!  ;D ;D
The veining and marking o nthe slightly larger bigelovii flowers is really gorgeous.
These guys are real favourites of mine!
Here are a couple of other Bulb Log Links about Scoliopus...
http://www.srgc.org.uk/bulblog/190303/log.html
http://www.srgc.org.uk/bulblog/log2005/010205/log.html
Two pix of S. bigelovii
Of course, they are named for Mr Bigelow, so the "v" is a twist.
http://www.marin.edu/cnps/Bigelow.html

Maggi
Edit: oops , didn't add the second pic as a thumbnail! Fixed now... click to enlrage!)

Yes, very cool plants for sure!

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

IMYoung
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-31

Todd wrote:

On close examination, the flowers are quite exquisite!

If the distribution is below 800m, I expect the hardiness rating is not too high, but then Vancouveria is rated zone 6-7 and Lori has it in Calgary (zone 3) so who knows the ultimate hardiness of Scoliopis.

The intricate shapes and markings of the flowers  repay close attention, that's for sure. There are deep furrows with the markings, very sculptural.

We've had the Scoliopus bigelovii down to minus 19 C for a longish spell some years ago and this year to around  minus ten for longer than we liked so it's proving tough enough for  N. E. Scotland.

Ian  and/or Margaret Young ( -here it is usually Margaret)

Aberdeen , North East Scotland, UK
Zone 8a

www.srgc.net

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

I found a good video showing Scoliopus bigelovii being pollinated by fungus gnats.  Some excellent close-up views of the flowers too.  You might want to turn down the music or mute it on this one, but all in all, a rare treat; would like to see more plant-related videos.

Screen capture of the YouTube video, this user BotanyVideo has a number of good ones to watch.

Scoliopus bigelovii - pollination
(tip: if you have high-speed internet, hit the "full screen" button on the right right, hit ESC to return screen to normal)

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

WimB
WimB's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

Some Thalictrum thalictroides in flower here now:

T thalictroides 'Babe'
T thalictroides 'Betty Blake'
T thalictroides 'Big'
T thalictroides 'Diamant'
T thalictroides 'Jade Feather'
T thalictroides 'Pink Diamant'
T thalictroides 'White Singel'
and T thalictroides 'XXL'

and two other shade lovers:

Glaucidium palmatum and Uvularia grandiflora 'Gold Leaf Form'

Wim Boens
Wingene Belgium zone 8a

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Beautiful, Wim.  The native Thalictrum thalictroides (we call them May flowers) are barely detectable at the soil surface here.

And our native Uvularia grandiflora are a half inch high.  Does your Gold Leaf Form have leaves that turn yellow later?  It looks like normal leaf color in your photo...

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

WimB
WimB's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

RickR wrote:

Beautiful, Wim.  The native Thalictrum thalictroides (we call them May flowers) are barely detectable at the soil surface here.

And our native Uvularia grandiflora are a half inch high.  Does your Gold Leaf Form have leaves that turn yellow later?  It looks like normal leaf color in your photo...

Hi Rick,

The leaves get a bit more yellow but it's not very spectacular...I wouldn't have given it a cultivar name. I've heard there's an orange flowering Uvularia going around. Anyone ever seen it?

Wim Boens
Wingene Belgium zone 8a

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

interesting to see the Thalictrum, our local sp has sprays of tiny flowers, and flowers in summer,,
Rick, on your wild T thalictroides, are the flowers at all large like these cultivars?

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

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