Miscellaneous Woodlanders

372 posts / 0 new
Last post
Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

McDonough wrote:

Lori, really like the appearance of Anemone trifoliata, can you tell me about it's rate of spread (I'm cautious with Anemone). I never think about Achlys triphylla, it is attractive, I should look to introduce that to some wilder parts of my woodland.

I really like Anemone trifoliata too!  It seems to be a slow spreader here... at least in the time I've had it.  I think I planted it in 2009. 
Trond, I think you have Anemone trifoliata too?  How is the rate of spread for you? 
Also, I can't remember if it goes dormant after blooming or not... must pay closer attention this year.

Pinellia cordata 'Yamazakii' is incredibly cute!  I wonder how hardy it is?

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Lori wrote:

Pinellia cordata 'Yamazakii' is incredibly cute!  I wonder how hardy it is?

This plant has been perfectly hardy here for the 5 years of so that I've had it (USDA Zone 5), but that's not enough information for your colder climate. It doesn't set seed (not that I've seen yet), so I'm not sure about its propagation options. Today I asked my daughter to smell the flowers; she thought it smelled very "fruity". Must work on getting this increased, too cute to lose.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Lori wrote:

McDonough wrote:

Lori, really like the appearance of Anemone trifoliata, can you tell me about it's rate of spread (I'm cautious with Anemone). I never think about Achlys triphylla, it is attractive, I should look to introduce that to some wilder parts of my woodland.

I really like Anemone trifoliata too!  It seems to be a slow spreader here... at least in the time I've had it.  I think I planted it in 2009. 
Trond, I think you have Anemone trifoliata too?  How is the rate of spread for you? 
Also, I can't remember if it goes dormant after blooming or not... must pay closer attention this year.

Pinellia cordata 'Yamazakii' is incredibly cute!  I wonder how hardy it is?

Anemone trifoliata behaves itself very well in my garden. It is slow to increase making a rather dense rhizome. I have not seen seedlings either but I have only one clone. Anemone trifoliata does go dormant during the summer like the other similar wood anemones.

I have not tried Pinellia yet but certainly have to!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Here's a view into the area under the 'Royalty' crabapple and also shaded by a large sweetberry honeysuckle (Lonicera caerulea) and by roses...
Geranium himalayense starting to bloom (sorry if this makes you shudder, Cohan  ;D); a rapidly-spreading Arnica of some sort - at least this one blooms so I'm not complaining!; Anemone trifoliata in the distance:

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Tony Willis
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-01

An interesting plant I obtained as Streptopus obtusatus flowering for the first time. I think it is wrongly named and a friend has suggested it is Disporum cantoniense which seems a better identification.

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

The speckling/mottling in the flowers is a nice touch.

  Would the square shoulders help in identification?

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Boy, even this 'minor' thread ( a personal fave) I'm way behind on- I've been spending all my time digging- a bunch of new veg beds, and still lots planned for ornamental beds...
L:ove the Chrysogonum! I'll have to watch for seeds of that available somewhere..

I also really like the Anemone trifoliata. I have A. nemorosa from roots planted in fall 2011, only a couple of flowers last year, a bit more this year, seems like it might make some nice clumps in a few years. A ranunculoides planted at the same time seems just a touch faster. They are near one another, so I'll be curious to see if I get any of the nice hybrid...
I also finally have some success with A nemorosa seeds after a number of failures, so I hope to get some other shades :)

Achlys is very nice, too...

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Tony, love that Streptopus or Disporum you show.  I purchased and planted a number of Disporum this summer, but I'm sure none as lovely as that plant.

As to Chrysogonum virginicum, I came to the decision to extract it from where it was planted, after it invaded other small plants, and replant them in a spot where it will be allowed to spread.  The species has several subspecies, with varying degree of spread, see my previous two posts on this, links below.  Cohan, not sure if it made any seed, I wasn't watching, of course for me, no need at it spreads quickly, but I'll try and watch next year.

https://www.nargs.org/comment/11840#comment-11840
https://www.nargs.org/comment/11845#comment-11845

I was surprised just how robust the roots were, and with seemingly modest growth above, the roots were tenacious and made for difficult uprooting. I was also surprised at how thick the stolons are.  The rate of spread is about 6" per (in all directions) per season.  Here's a photo showing an uprooted piece.

I am working on a new shady area that quite large, the result of "limbing up" a row of fir and spruce trees that borders my side property line.  It was a tremendous effort to "get inside" the trees with incredibly dense branching to the ground, and also much effort to spade some soil pockets removing stones and roots.  There's the chosen relocation, at the base of Uvularia grandiflora, before and after planting.

  

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Looks like a nice new area. I haven't done any limbing, but plenty of digging amongst roots!

Re: Disporum, I can't remember if I've told this tale before here, but I thought I'd collected berries of Disporum trachycarpum in the woods on the farm, a few years back. The berries have a distinctive look, so I was pretty confident in my id, and happy since this was the first time I'd come across this species. Well, it was also the last- despite revisiting the site repeatedly over several years, I have never found any further trace of the plant in  leaf, flower or fruit.  I'd pretty much convinced myself that I was just confused about Maianthemum stellatum which also grows there. Seemed an unlikely confusion, since I am so familiar with the Maianthemum, and again, those Disporum berries are distinctive, and not remotely like Maianthemum berries.

If there was Disporum there, I suppose something could have eaten it, or it could have been covered by a fallen tree, of which there have been a number- but I really would have thought it could easily send shoots a foot or so over to get around any logs...

Anyway, I did get germination after a year or two, and I'd been watching the seedlings- not conclusive, since I'd never seen Maianthemum seedlings. I  had a batch of something come up in a nearby pot, which was supposed to have Elaeagnus seed in it, and those are pretty clearly M stellatum (how does that happen? I can see getting a few seeds of natives in seed pots outdoors, but an entire pot of evenly distributed seedlings??? no elaeagnus...same thing happened in a pot with Lindera seed- a full crop of Cornus canadensis- no Lindera :( ).. So now i am thinking maybe those really are Disporum seedlings... I planted them out in a new bed a while back, so we'll see.. doubt they'll flower yet next year.. Planted out the Maianthemum seedlings too..

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Mark, those Chrysogonum roots look pretty scary, like they are going to take over the world!  I think the hard life under an evergreen might be just the right place for them.  I know exactly what you mean about the amazing amount of brush removed when limbing those evergreens, even from just for one tree.   By the way, if the fir limbs were down to the ground previously, that initial limbing up will be very stressful on the tree.  Think about the conditions before (deeply shaded, relatively moist with little air movement) compared to now.  I limbed mine up over a 2 year period.  This year, I planted some excess Orangekönigin epimedium under a white spruce, a white pine and and arborvitae... watered them once and left them to there own devices.  We did have all that extra rain this spring and summer, but none for an entire month now, and they still look treat.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Pages

Log in or register to post comments