Miscellaneous Woodlanders

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Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

A quietly attractive plant for a woodland setting is Tellima grandiflora (Fringecups) from Western North America. Mine came to me misidentified as Boykinia rotundifolia (that species is from California). The flowers start out green but age pink. To 18" tall.

 

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Gene Mirro
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-25

In the Pacific NW, you need to be careful with Tellima.  If you let it go to seed, you will be sorry.  And they are extremely difficult to kill with herbicide. 

SW Washington state, 600 ft. altitude

Tony Willis
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-01

Gene wrote:

In the Pacific NW, you need to be careful with Tellima.  If you let it go to seed, you will be sorry.  And they are extremely difficult to kill with herbicide. 

The same in NW England it is a complete nuisance but nice

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Gene wrote:

In the Pacific NW, you need to be careful with Tellima.  If you let it go to seed, you will be sorry.  And they are extremely difficult to kill with herbicide. 

Although it self seeds here in coastal Norway too it is not a problem (yet) and not difficult to remove like some other weeds.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Hmmm, thanks for the head's up warnings everyone, had a similar warning on Facebook.  Well, it was supposed to be a Boykinia.  Hasn't shown any tendencies of spreading just yet (3 years here), but I'll watch it carefully, and if I spy lots of seedlings, will be sure to eradicate; it's a pleasant enough plant but I don't need yet another thug to invade my garden.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

I grew Tellima grandiflora from seed one year.  They all died the second winter. ???
Nice pink fall foliage, but flowers weren't even as nice as yours, Mark. 

I wasn't too heart broken by the loss.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Afloden
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-01-15

Mark,

My single plant of Tellima has remained as a small clump that has never produced a seedling, nor divided enough to have a larger clump in the garden. It must not enjoy the east as much as its native habitat.

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

When I moved here I found a small clump of lavender coloured Anemone nemorosa, possible 'Robinsoniana'. Now it has spread with seed to a lot of new sites and I have several forms - it has possibly crossed with the wild windflower. They are much later than the common white ones.
Here is at least two clones (not easy to see in the picture though) and the colour is darker in real.
Another plant growing at the property was Polygonatum multiflorum. It has spread by runners to a huge patch in the woodland - making a nice understory among the rhododendrons. Unfortunately the Diphylleia sinesis doesn't spread!

   

Although these Maianthemums don't have the most colourful flowers they have handsome leaves and the berries are nice in the fall. Sorry, don't remember the names although I have planted them myself (you can spot my foot in the last picture).

   

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Very nice, Trond!  I wish my Anemone nemorosa would flourish like that.  I also wish Diphylleia liked the dry conditions here... oh well.
Very striking foliage on the Maianthemum.

A west-coaster that is hardy here, vanilla-leaf, Achlys triphylla... somewhat spreading, though:

Anemone trifoliata and Viola canadensis:
   

Omphalodes verna:

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Aaron, thanks for adding your notes on Tellima grandiflora, maybe it will be well behaved enough here in the East. Although I have taken into consideration warnings by others, and will remove the plant if it shows any worrisome spreading tendencies.

Lori, really like the appearance of Anemone trifoliata, can you tell me about it's rate of spread (I'm cautious with Anemone). I never think about Achlys triphylla, it is attractive, I should look to introduce that to some wilder parts of my woodland.

Trond, good to see Diphylleia sinensis, I grow the other two species cymosa and have two-year seedlings of D. grayi.  My garden tends to be too dry for these plants, but I manage to keep D. cymosa going for a long number of years now, and I hope D. grayi too.

Here's the cutest little thing, dare I say, a Pinellia. This is Pinellia cordata 'Yamazakii', a tiny well-behaved form. It emerges so late (just a few days ago) I always think I've lost it; for me it stays as a small clump, with cute hooded blooms and skywards spadices. The best part, the flowers give off a strong aroma like sweet juicy-fruit bubblegum! I'm not kidding!

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

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