Miscellaneous Woodlanders

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Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Wim, thank you for the information. I have to join that Göteborgian club!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

cohan
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Joined: 2011-02-03

WimB wrote:

Trond, I'm not laughing with you....only with Cohan's comment....just say the word "seeds" and there he is!  ;) ;) ;D

Because my chances to buy interesting plants are very few!...lol Besides, going through catalogues- and trying to find out what the uncommon plants are, is a great pleasure :)

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

WimB
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Joined: 2011-01-31

cohan wrote:

WimB wrote:

Trond, I'm not laughing with you....only with Cohan's comment....just say the word "seeds" and there he is!  ;) ;) ;D

Because my chances to buy interesting plants are very few!...lol Besides, going through catalogues- and trying to find out what the uncommon plants are, is a great pleasure :)

Just pulling your leg, Cohan  ;)

Wim Boens
Wingene Belgium zone 8a

cohan
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Joined: 2011-02-03

WimB wrote:

cohan wrote:

WimB wrote:

Trond, I'm not laughing with you....only with Cohan's comment....just say the word "seeds" and there he is!  ;) ;) ;D

Because my chances to buy interesting plants are very few!...lol Besides, going through catalogues- and trying to find out what the uncommon plants are, is a great pleasure :)

Just pulling your leg, Cohan  ;)

No, really, your characterisation was very accurate...lol.. have to remember to check that Goteberg site ;)

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

It is Kirengeshoma season again!  This year, the spring rainfall was plentiful, and this moisture-loving woodlander grew robust, the clumps taller than me so topping 6' (2 meters) in height, and once laden with waxy yellow bells and the stems declining somewhat under their weight, spreading to 8' across.  This is a GIANT PLANT that needs room.  And, after many many years, and never a self-sown seedling, in the last couple of exceptionally mild autumns and early winters, seed was plentiful and a handful of self-sown seedlings have appeared... I must get these moved to where they have room to mature.

A number of views of Kirensheshoma palmata in bloom, a show that'll go on for about 2 months, unless drought sets in.  The flowers essentially take two day to open, at first the spiral unfolding buds are intriguing, and at full bloom, the open ulily-like shape of the waxy yellow blooms is appreciated so late in the season.  The flowers appear in the upper leaf axils, up to 3 levels of bloom.

 

Part of an enormous Sugar Maple that fell recently and squashed parts of my garden, I worried more about having a tree-cutting crew in, with inevitable damage from human trampling being much worse than the fallen tree damage; part of the tree cut-up work has been done by an arborist that also happens to be a plant person who took care to stay on garden paths and not trample plants to any extent possible, the lone shoot of Kirengeshoma koreana stands proud, among considerable first-hand plant devestation from a 4' wide tree trunk falling on the area. I'm happy with the outcome.
http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?topic=807.msg18351#msg18351

Last, a view of Thalictrum rochebrunianum as a normal 5'-9" tall human might see it; sort of ridiculous, the plant must be 8-9' tall (3 m) this year.  It would have to be planted in a low ravine, and observed from a up-slope path 1 meter higher to even begin to appreciate the flowers.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

cohan
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Wow, those are some giants! I don't have anything like that here- the tallest thing is the native Heracleum, and its usually not much more than 90cm..

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Three views of Deinanthe bifida, blooming now in the woodland garden.  Not sure why I grow this oddity, not that I mind an oddity, I like such things, but because I can't find a place moist enough for it.  This plant is like the proverbial canary in the coal mine, sulking dramatically at the first whiff of dryness.  After a month of relentless hot sunny days, finally with some rain relief this past week, the flopping collapsing mass of foliage stood up, the weird waxy white blooms with pinkish pedicel tips, opening from brownish drought-tinged buds. Is it worth growing this leafy thing, dumping what seems like hundreds of gallons of water on it (mild exaggeration) just to keep it alive during a month without rain, ultimately with modest, ephemeral, curious blooms decidely small in proportion to the leafiness; I'm not sure.

 

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

cohan
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

It does seem pretty, and nice to have later woodlanders.. though whether its worthwhile in your recent dry summers is another question...

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

deesen
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

McDonough wrote:

.......... Is it worth growing this leafy thing, dumping what seems like hundreds of gallons of water on it (mild exaggeration) just to keep it alive during a month without rain, ultimately with modest, ephemeral, curious blooms decidely small in proportion to the leafiness; I'm not sure.

Depends Mark. If you are a man with infinite patience and time, press on. If not the compost heap beckons although it's a pretty little thing.

David Nicholson
in Devon, UK  Zone 9b

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Mark, glad the damage weren't unbearable! Nice to see the Kirengeshoma. My plants have started to dwindle - don't know why :-\
I like Deinanthe and have a couple I think, but they grow in dense shade and are seldom seen :-\ :-\

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

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