Miscellaneous Woodlanders

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WimB
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Joined: 2011-01-31

And I forgot some others:

Thalictrum thalictroides 'Amelia'
Thalictrum thalictroides 'Pink Flash'
Uvularia grandiflora 'Gold Leaf Form' (the leaves turn yellow after flowering)
Hepatica nobilis 'Perrine's Pink' (just for the leaves)

Wim Boens
Wingene Belgium zone 8a

Hoy
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Joined: 2009-12-15

You really have some gems, Wim!

Does the flower of the hepatica stand up against the leaves?

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Hoy
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Joined: 2009-12-15

The cresses are starting now, here are two:

Cardamine pentaphylla and waldsteinii, and a lone Primula of unknown parentage:
   

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

cohan
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Joined: 2011-02-03

Wim- that Primula really is red!

Trond- love the Cardamines and nice colour on that Primula;
Earlier I'd reported how happy I was with the two auriculas I planted last summer, one of which flowered in fall, and I could see bright green overwintered foliage as soon as the snow melted.. Well, my report of excellent hardiness here seems premature, since while one came through nicely, the other seems gone, unless it resprouts later...  :(

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

The wild Pyrola spp. in Minnesota are very floriferous compared to Cardamine laciniata.  If each growing point of cardamine is thought of as a separate plant, pyrolas would be ten time more floriferous.  I have never notice that pyrolas are rhizomatous, I don't think they are.

All great pics, Wim.  That's really a deep color for D. cucullaria, I think.

I don't think the native Thalictrum thalictroides liked the snowless, warm winter this past season.  The Schoaff's Double in my garden seems to be unaffected, but the native ones have taken a big step backwards.  Still true to the trend this spring, though, the native ones' flower color seems to be deeper.

Schoaff's Double - 1 April, and 8 April

       

The gold foliage on that Bellwort must be striking, Wim.  Our Minnesota native Uvularia grandiflora has twisted petals - something I always thought set it apart from similar species, but I guess it is not a defining trait after all.

       

       

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

cohan
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I notice much more flowering in the native woodland species here after a snowy winter- that snowmelt is key moisture here, since we often don't get a lot of rain after the snow stops until late May/June..

I'm pretty sure Pyrolas here (mainly asarifolia, though there are others, as well as Orthilia and Monese) are rhizomatous, or stoloniferous, or something (Okay, I checked Moss/Packer and they use the phrase for the genus 'creeping rootstocks) since they all tend to form patches, with, esp for Pyrola, a low rate of flowering.. in the mixed woods right behind my house, they colony or adjoining colonies extend over a large area-- many many square metres (I should attempt some sort of measurement, since these large patches fascinate me) though never exclusive of other plants which grow among, through, above the Pyrolas- a number of patches extending (maybe?)15-20 feet in all directions, with small breaks and other patches next to them.... Flower stalks are certaily not uncommon, and might cluster several near, but then there could be several feet or more to the next (I'll have to try to dig up some photos...).. I think colonies in sunnier spots might have a slightly higher rate of flowering, though I have not encountered such extensive groups in sunnier spots..

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

That's interesting, Cohan.  I got that idea from your first posting about pyrola "mats", but I have never seen them do that here.  Thanks for the clarification.  Perhaps I have just not been to the right places.  Of the three Minnesota flora books I have, only one mentions the rhizomatous quality of pyrola (so I am wrong).  In A Flora of Northeastern Minnesota, Lakela notes the trait for all six native Pyrola spp. there, and for Moneses uniflora.  Indeed, ones that I have seen up there could be so, but nothing really suggested to me that the colonies, usually of 1 to 10 sparsely spaced plants, were connected. :-\  I have noted mats of Moneses uniflora, though.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

WimB
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Joined: 2011-01-31

Hoy wrote:

You really have some gems, Wim!

Does the flower of the hepatica stand up against the leaves?

Thanks, Hoy!
I wouldn't know, I just bought it (the leaves were really eye-catching  ;D). I guess it doesn't really matter anyhow...it probably flowers before the new leaves start growing.
The flower is described as pink with a white starry middle  :-\ I wonder

cohan wrote:

Wim- that Primula really is red!

Cohan,

it is indeed, a vibrant red and it keeps on flowering for months, it's a superb plant!

RickR wrote:

All great pics, Wim.  That's really a deep color for D. cucullaria, I think.

Thanks Rick,

that D. cucullaria 'Pink Punk' is a selection made by Susan Band of Pitcairn nurseries (http://www.pitcairnalpines.co.uk/)

Wim Boens
Wingene Belgium zone 8a

cohan
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Joined: 2011-02-03

Wim- for months, wow!

Rick, no doubt a matter of the growing conditions- if there are only a few plants, you wouldn't notice 'creeping rootstocks'.. of course not every colony is that extensive here, but I probably couldn't go more than a few metres anywhere on my property (except the sunniest mowed patchs) without seeing some... I still have to dig up some of those pics...lol

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Some Pyrola species make loose mats of plants by underground runners which can be very long! I know as I once tried to move one clump to my garden. Never more. . . And as Cohan says, it commoner in dark woodland than in open situations.
Othilia makes mats too - I have seen patches about 2 meter across. Moneses also make patches but much smaller.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

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