Miscellaneous spring bulbs

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Hoy
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Joined: 2009-12-15

Very nice all those small springflowering bulbs! More species to try inthe garden ;)

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Boland
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Joined: 2009-09-25

I have been growing S. mischtschenkoana (I didn't know it was spelled this way) for years.  It is the first bulbs to bloom in the garden, even earlier than snowdrops!  Mine normally bloom in early-mid April.  Delightful species that puts on a great show.

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

WimB
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Todd wrote:

I have been growing S. mischtschenkoana (I didn't know it was spelled this way) for years.  It is the first bulbs to bloom in the garden, even earlier than snowdrops!  Mine normally bloom in early-mid April.  Delightful species that puts on a great show.

Charming species indeed, and not very hard to grow and to multiply in the garden. I've heard it's been renamed to Scilla tubergiana (not sure if that's correct though).

Here are two small bulbs which are flowering now:

Corydalis wendelboi and the very small Fritillaria pudica.

Wim Boens
Wingene Belgium zone 8a

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Wim, interesting that you show Eranthis and Ranunculus kochii together, as indeed the flowers on the Ranunculus are somewhat reminiscent of Eranthis.  I only recently learned that this "tuberous" Ranunculus has become popularly grown by Dutch bulb growers, being that the tubers can be stored like regular bulbs and tubers.

Matt, really like your Hyacinthoides aristides, I wonder if it hardy enough for our Massachusetts climate outdoors.

Luc,  both species you show are attractive, although Scilla libanotica with the flat wide-open stars really catches my attention.

Wim again, my goodness your spring is early to already have Corydalis and frits in bloom.  If I were only allowed to grow one Fritillaria species, it would be F. pudica, a slow by easy grower outside, and a long-lived reliable bloomer here. Although it is a lily beetle magnet and I must pick the beetles daily.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

WimB
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McDonough wrote:

Wim, interesting that you show Eranthis and Ranunculus kochii together, as indeed the flowers on the Ranunculus are somewhat reminiscent of Eranthis.  I only recently learned that this "tuberous" Ranunculus has become popularly grown by Dutch bulb growers, being that the tubers can be stored like regular bulbs and tubers.

Wim again, my goodness your spring is early to already have Corydalis and frits in bloom.  If I were only allowed to grow one Fritillaria species, it would be F. pudica, a slow by easy grower outside, and a long-lived reliable bloomer here. Although it is a lily beetle magnet and I must pick the beetles daily.

Mark, they're both in the Ranunculaceae family after all.  ;)  I didn't buy my Ranunculus kochii from our northern neighbours, but I've seen it offered more and more by Dutch bulb-sellers indeed.

It seems spring has started for real now. They predict dry and sunny weather until next Tuesday at least (with frost during the night) so I guess there will be a lot more flowering plants in a couple of days. No lily beetles here yet (too early in the year I guess).

Wim Boens
Wingene Belgium zone 8a

Hoy
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Joined: 2009-12-15

No Corydalis has started blooming here yet, but some have advance shoots now!
Wim, Do you grow C wendelboi in the garden or in pots? I have thought of acquiring that species in memory of Per Wendelbo whom the plant is named for. He died in a car accident in Bergen 30 years ago.

I would like to grow F pudica too but slugs can't resist such plants either :'(

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

WimB
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Hoy wrote:

No Corydalis has started blooming here yet, but some have advance shoots now!
Wim, Do you grow C wendelboi in the garden or in pots? I have thought of acquiring that species in memory of Per Wendelbo whom the plant is named for. He died in a car accident in Bergen 30 years ago.

I would like to grow F pudica too but slugs can't resist such plants either :'(

Trond,

I grow C. wendelboi in a trough together with some rock plants and small plants.

Wim Boens
Wingene Belgium zone 8a

Hoy
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Joined: 2009-12-15

Thanks, Wim. If a find a niche I'll give it a try :D

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

LucS
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Joined: 2011-02-12

Two of the many corydalis that are coming in flower now:
Corydalis angustifolius "Talysh dawn"
Corydalis tauricola x caucasica alba

Torhout-Flanders-Belgium-zone 8a

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

LucS wrote:

Two of the many corydalis that are coming in flower now:
Corydalis angustifolius "Talysh dawn"
Corydalis tauricola x caucasica alba

Very nice Luc, all are nice but being partial to soft pink, 'Talysh Dream' catches my fancy.  Is the last one a natural hybrid or something that occurred in your garden or in cultivation someplace?

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

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