Lysimachia lichiangensis

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Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27
Lysimachia lichiangensis

Apropos of nothing really, but sort of interesting...
From a quick google, it seems there are a staggering number of mislabelled photos/plants out there, that are claimed to be Lysimachia lichiangensis, but appear instead to be various yellow-flowered Lysimachia spp. (often L. punctata). :o (This, even from some nurseries! ???)

Here is the eFlora of China description, which describes the flowers as white to pink, for starters:
http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=2&taxon_id=210001190

How surprising!

Photos that might be correct are few and far between, and seem to show only the flower spike or basal seedling leaves - not the entire plant. Does anyone grow it? I'd love to see photos of the mature plant.

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Lori, in Flora of China, there is a photo showing your subject plant, with white flowers.
(I include the link for quick access ;-) 
http://www.efloras.org/object_page.aspx?object_id=89569&flora_id=800

I chanced upon this message tonight, and was looking at the large number of Lysimachia in China, then stumbled across an exciting "Plants of Tibet" site, which I'll be featuring shortly, and in that site, there was a photo of L. pumila.  These are all new to me, so I'm sure there are some wonderful Chinese species awaiting introduction, or at least a photographic sneak preview.  Here are two links:

Lysimachia pumila
http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=2&taxon_id=200017082
http://plantsoftibet.lifedesks.org/node/2408
http://plantsoftibet.lifedesks.org/image/view/2408/_original

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Yes, as you mentioned, it seems they have been adding photos to that site, which will be fascinating to go through!  

I came across the photo of L. lichiangensis a few days ago too, coincidentally... and what I grew from seed last year as "Lysimachia lichiangensis" is, I believe, actually Lysimachia yunnanensis (it obligingly bloomed in the first year from seed):

It has very small flowers, unlike the spike of L. lichiangensis; the leaf shape is a little different than photos of L. yunnanensis that I've found, but it seems pretty close...  Oh well.

Isn't L. pumila a charmer!  It may take over from L. ephemerum (which was very pretty but got overwhelmed by the ruffians around it) as my favourite Lysimachia!

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

You are quite right, Lori.
I have twice been disappointed with my so called Lysimachia lichiangensis-seed. Both times ended with common punctata. >:(

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Lori, it's amazing how you get so many things to flower in their first year; I guess starting plants off under lights really pays off. :D

This thread is reminding me of another Lysimachia that has become hugely popular. I remember when it was introduced as a rare new species that redefined our impression of Lysimachia.  I was at a NARGS annual convention years ago, sitting next to Don Jacobs of Eco Gardens, and he talked enthusiastically about a dwarf Lysimachia he collected on Mt. Omei (Emei) China, it was L. congestiflora.  He introduced two forms, one with a silky reddish color to the leaves (named 'Eco Dark Satin').  Many other forms are now in the trade.

The regular form: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Malphighia2.jpg

I grew it in my Seattle-area garden when I lived in Washington State, and it was a fine semi-low growing plant that spread a few feet. Now, these are grown as bedding annuals and connoisseur annuals or half-hardy perennials for planters (one of the Proven Winners trademarked plants), found in most any garden center and nursery in these parts, even in the florists department of grocery stores.  It is not reliably hardy here, and is rated USDA Zone 6 (I would guess Zone 7).

Images of Lysimachia congestiflora:
http://www.google.com/images?hl=en&sugexp=gsisc&xhr=t&q=lysimachia+congestiflora&cp=24&bav=on.2,or.&um=1&ie=UTF-8&source=univ&sa=X&ei=5Op4Tb2LMPKH0QGdjcnVAw&sqi=2&ved=0CC8QsAQ&biw=1280&bih=809

Nursery links:
http://www.lazyssfarm.com/Plants/Perennials/L_files/L_Images/lysimachia_...
http://www.goodnessgrows.com/id125.html
...a variegated form, with a new trademarked name of Walkabout Sunset (an Australian reference?)
http://www.provenwinners.com/plants/detail.cfm?photoID=6789
...and a purple-leaf form named 'Persian Chocolate'  (a Middle Eastern reference for this Chinese plant!)
http://www.finegardening.com/plantguide/lysimachia-congestiflora-persian...
http://www.skagitgardens.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=plants.plantDetail&pla...

The risk:
Some Lysimachia are well know for their aggressive spreading by rhizomes.  A species that is hardy here, Lysimachia clethroides, a true beauty with white flowers and graceful wands of bloom that nod at the tip, but it grows like a thug and must be constrained in some way, and is best avoided.  I see it in the FOC species list. ;)
http://www.google.com/images?hl=en&q=Lysimachia+clethroides&bav=on.2,or.&um=1&ie=UTF-8&source=univ&sa=X&ei=cvF4TcRb67PRAZz7jO0D&ved=0CCUQsAQ&biw=1280&bih=809

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

L. congestiflora is really attractive, but it's just a "bedding plant" here, unfortunately.
L. clethroides is not a thug here (or at least has not been for me, anyway)... the climate and dryness, I assume, keep it well under control (though I certainly know of its well-deserved reputation in areas like yours where the conditions are more suitable for it).

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Skulski wrote:

L. congestiflora is really attractive, but it's just a "bedding plant" here, unfortunately.
L. clethroides is not a thug here (or at least has not been for me, anyway)... the climate and dryness, I assume, keep it well under control (though I certainly know of its well-deserved reputation in areas like yours where the conditions are more suitable for it).

Even in my Zone 7-8 Seattle area garden, L. congestiflora had a tough time surviving the winter, I believe the Zone 6 rating is overly optimistic and merely helps sell more plants.  

I might actually try planting some L. punctata and L. clethroides in a wild-ish area near my driveway, where they can "duke it out" and fight for space.  I love the look of both, just not their rampant spreading when grown among gentler neighbors.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

I have not actually observed any rhizomatous spread of my normally-coloured L. punctata plants in over a decade, despite that it is certainly hardier and/or better suited to our conditions than L. clethroides.  I have had a variegated form of L. puncata, the cultivar 'Alexander', get a bit loose and very mildly spreading though.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

I consider L punctata a problematic plant. It spreads rampantly and tolerates both shade and sun with enough moisture. It even survives complete dry-out in the summer, leaves and flowers succumb but not the rhizomes.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Hoy wrote:

I consider L. punctata a problematic plant. It spreads rampantly and tolerates both shade and sun with enough moisture. It even survives complete dry-out in the summer, leaves and flowers succumb but not the rhizomes.

Trond, I have similar experience with it as you, here it is a "thugaceous" (why is this not a real term ;D) plant.  I do not grow it here in my current garden, but did in a previous garden, and it wants to conquer its immediate surrounds.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Lysimachia clethroides (Gooseneck Loosestrife) goes rampant here in Minnesota, too.  L. punctata can be tamed if planted in poor, dry soil, allowing it to wilt from time to time, especially if placed with tree root competition. ;D  I imagine the same would happen with L. clethroides.  The "duking it out"  scenario kinda scares me: would I really want the most menacing plant to win?

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

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