Lilies, anyone?

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Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Thank you very much, Gene!
I have slug bait but it is not very useful outside with lots of rain. I like to grow lilies (and other plants as well) in as natural settings as possible and it is impossible to keep all places slug-free.
The winters are usually mild with a few cold spells but the two last winters were very cold. However the soil did not freeze very deep.

I would like to try seed of martagon and wigginsi, please!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Toole
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-07-02

First flowering from seed --label lost  :rolleyes:

I suspect it's a North American sps --maybe L.columbianum ?.....although only the one flower on an arching pedicel.

Didn't notice the 'hitchhikers' until i was viewing the pic on the computer ---needless to say they have been dispatched .....

Cheers Dave

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

It does look like L. columbianum, assuming it has whorled leaves.  First flowers are not always the best to identify, but the large anthers and pedicel form also aid in a positive ID of the species.

Congratulations on growing it to flowering from seed, Roland.  Although easy to germinate, these western American species are difficult for me in my climate.  Except for L. pardilinum, I haven't been successful.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Toole
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Joined: 2010-07-02

RickR wrote:

It does look like L. columbianum, assuming it has whorled leaves.  First flowers are not always the best to identify, but the large anthers and pedicel form also aid in a positive ID of the species.

Congratulations on growing it to flowering from seed, Roland.  Although easy to germinate, these western American species are difficult for me in my climate.  Except for L. pardilinum, I haven't been successful.

Thanks Rick
It has whorled leaves so my guess was correct.

A number of the Western N.A. sps do well here althought i'm still yet to master L.washingtonianum ....

Here's L.grayi currently in bloom .

Cheers Dave.

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

Toole
Toole's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-07-02

Here's another Lily in bloom --first flowering from seed NZAGS sown Aug 09 as L buchianum --the name a bit of a mystery to me--maybe it should be L buschianum ,(probably my spelling mistake originally-- :rolleyes:), which i see is a synonym of L.concolor var pulchellum ...

Cheers Dave.

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Dave, L. grayi is a beauty! The second one, L. buschianum or whatever - is the flower zygorphic or a little damaged?

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

That lily does look like L. concolor, but var. pulchellum is not supposed to have spots.  I grow varieties strictum and coridion, and both have the characteristically short (for a Lilium) style.

I have yet to see a photo of Lilium grayi that wasn't to die for.  Yours is not exception, Dave.  It seems they are more "common" outside the USA!  Peter Zale is still looking for a verifiable wild source of seed for this species for the Ornamental Plant Germplasm Center on the Ohio State campus.  If anyone can help, send me a message/email and I can give you his contact info.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Toole
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-07-02

Hoy wrote:

Dave, L. grayi is a beauty! The second one, L. buschianum or whatever - is the flower zygorphic or a little damaged?

Thanks Hoy

Damaged i think.

RickR wrote:

That lily does look like L. concolor, but var. pulchellum is not supposed to have spots.  I grow varieties strictum and coridion, and both have the characteristically short (for a Lilium) style.

I have yet to see a photo of Lilium grayi that wasn't to die for.  Yours is not exception, Dave.  It seems they are more "common" outside the USA!

Hello Rick
L.concolor it is then  :)   although I thought var. pulchellum could have a faint spotting ,however whether my plant shown qualifies under that heading i'm uncertain :-\ ..........

I have a number of seedlings of L.concolor from other sources coming along --it will be interesting to compare 'notes' when they finally flower.

Cheers Dave.

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

Toole
Toole's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-07-02

Reaching about 1.2 mtrs in height Lilium monadelphum is so out of scale growing in the middle of one of the small rock gardens --each year about this time i remember i should get round to lifting the small clump...Later this year i will ,(i will !!)..... ;D ;D

Cheers Dave.

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

A stately species, Dave! I have tried it several times but never got it growing. The slugs attack the soft stem when it is about a foot high and the plant is damaged >:(

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

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