Lilies, anyone?

235 posts / 0 new
Last post
RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

I received Lilium maculatum var. wilsonii in 2006 as bulbs from the SLPG (Species Lily Preservation Group).  It is an upfacing lily with very shiny foliage.  It has been used in breeding for this characteristic as well as its flower traits, and has yielded very good cultivars.  

         Lilium maculatum var. wilsonii   12 Jul 2011

             

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

One of our native lilies in Minnesota is Lilium michiganense.  Flowers are arranged in one (usually) or two umbels.  Unlike most lily species with umbel inflorescenses, L. michiganense produces varying lengths of pedicels in the same umbel.  Also normal is a non-uniform degree of pedicel ascension.  But whatever the angle of the pedicel, the flower is always held with the same aspect, even on single flowering stems.  In the 90 degree days, growth moves along rather quickly...

      Lilium michiganense     15 Jul 2011         16 Jul 2011

       

                    17 Jul 2011

               

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Beautiful!  And how observant you are, too!  How many lily species are native there?  (We, of course, are rather impoverished here with only one.)

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

One is still better than nil ;) Although you can sometimes find lilies as garden escapes here none are native.

If those gastropods hadn't existed I had grown more lilies ;D

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Tony Willis
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-01

Rick

the L. michiganense is a super plant. I managed to flower it for the first time here this year but it was only single flowers,so I hope for better next year.

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Wow, this is a great thread.  Thanks Rick and other Liliphiles, I've learned so much looking through the many posts; I realize how little I know about the genus, what elegant treasures the genus holds.  Never heard of L. callosum, and a delightful thing it is.  We probably take for granted our many North American Lilium species, with the focus on Asiatic ones instead, but seeing natives such as Lilium michiganense demonstrates that are some supremely beautiful species in N.A.

The Flora of North America describes 21 species (lumping many of the varieties or subspecies previously named), with a lengthy discussion of the genus; apparently the taxonomy is complex.
http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=1&taxon_id=118558

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Tony Willis
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-01

Mark

you have some really wonderful ones. Our trip this year was in part to hopefully see some of them and we were very kindly supplied with lots of sites by Gene Miro one of your great experts. Although we found lots of plants the late season meant we were much too early to see them in flower. We did however see some lovely Lilium rubescens in the redwoods on I101 in N. California. I also show an unusual form which was growing with the others.

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

We have two Minnesota native lilies:
--- Lilium michiganense
--- Lilium philadelphicum

Minnesota consists of 3 major biomes: prairie grasslands, deciduous woods and coniferous forests.  Both of these species have found niches in all three biomes.

non-native Lilium lancifolium might be found as garden remnants at old farmsteads where the buildings are long gone, but I have never seen them actually escape into the wild.

My latest batch of L. michiganense from seed began blooming this year.  I have to say, though, that while I try to be fastidious about record keeping, I'm not so much with plant care.  I had hand pollinated this seed lot from wild sourced plants.  Seed was planted very late: 26 Jan 2008 (inside), put in the refrigerator 23 April 2008, and placed outside in July for its first season of above ground growth.  The photo shows a new raised bed constructed last fall.  Until that time, I had ten seedlings crammed into two 3.5 x 3.5 x 5 inch (9x9x12.7cm) pots.  To my surprise, one plant even had two blooms!

             

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Tony, rubescens is a nice species, and I have seen other pics of it with flowers that age darker, but never as much as the one you show.  Very nice! I tend to like flowers that age to a different color, and I presently have some Aurelian seedlings that do just that.  Even the more common Spiraea japonica 'Shibori' has a place in my yard.

Most western lilies species have germinated easily for me and I get them to the first leaf stage, but so far, none have continued in my climate.  I have never bought a western North American lily bulb to get a head start, though.  These have been on the back burner for a while now, as I focus on easier lily endeavors.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

RickR wrote:

Tony, rubescens is a nice species, and I have seen other pics of it with flowers that age darker, but never as much as the one you show.  Very nice! I tend to like flowers that age to a different color, and I presently have some Aurelian seedlings that do just that.  Even the more common Spiraea japonica 'Shibori' has a place in my yard.

Most western lilies species have germinated easily for me and I get them to the first leaf stage, but so far, none have continued in my climate.  I have never bought a western North American lily bulb to get a head start, though.  These have been on the back burner for a while now, as I focus on easier lily endeavors.

Do you think any of the western lilies could do here?
I am very fascinated by lilies but as I have told slugs devour the plants as fast as I get them. At my summerhouse though they fare better. However there I have to watch for lily beetles >:( Still many lilies do very well there.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Pages

Log in or register to post comments