late season interest?

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Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Mark, may I request your help to identify this unknown Allium that is in bloom now?  I can get better photos if needed (though I doubt you will need them!!)  Edit: Identified as Allium senescens var. glaucum.  

Here are some more late-bloomers...
Silene schafta:

Dianthus amurensis:

Solidago 'Crown of Rays', being enjoyed by a variety of bees, wasps, flies, and butterflies (a skipper, in this case):
     

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

You still have a lot of plants in flower, Lori! And the next week seems to be a good one for more flowers too ;)

Very few small plants flower here now - almost all are huge. Here is Lonicera henryi, an evergreen climber that flower all summer but sparsely and the spent flowers turn into black berries during fall and winter. it is strong growing, last summer I had to remove a shoot that had found its way behind the wall panel from the groundfloor to the top of the roof (8 meters in darkness) where it spread out and flowered.

 

This Euonymus planipes has very nice "flowers" in the fall from a young age.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

Was away most of August and couldn't wait to get back to check for damage from Irene.  Thankfully, all OK here.
The Cyclamen fatrense is now in bloom.  It's the only cyclamen that has done well here and came form Dick Redfield.
Dick told me some people insist that this is really Cyclamen purparescens, but that never succeeded here and this one does.  Usually the leaves show some marbling but not this year.

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

It is a very pretty plant regardless what you call it ;)

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Lori, that's a very good looking clump of Allium sikkimense (worthy of 2 pictures!).  The second Allium you posted is surely a form of Allium senescens var. glaucum; plants in cultivation are very variable as it hybridizes readily with other forms of senescens (and other alliums too if present and flowering at the same late season).  I'm still envious of the Dalea purpurea, it's the only seed variety that you sent me for which I received no germination :'(

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Trond, I love the Euonymus planipes, such beautiful and distinctive red fruits, reminds me of gals from The Red Hat Society:
http://www.google.com/search?q=red+hat+society&hl=en&biw=1280&bih=782&prmd=ivns&source=lnms&tbm=isch&ei=QmRpTs7DMobe0QGfmKXjBA&sa=X&oi=mode_link&ct=mode&cd=2&sqi=2&ved=0CEkQ_AUoAQ
How tall does it grow?  Can it be classified as a "small tree"?

One that I planted about 10 years ago continues to provide a long season of interest and fruiting spectacle, Euonymus sachalinensis.  Here's two photos from a number of years ago, it needs a bit of pruning to best reveal the dangling fruits (red pods with orange "berries" or seeds), and this year I never got around to trimming it up, but it is still quite a show right now.  There are a bunch of "Spindle Tree" Euonymus species that have similar fruiting appeal.  I first encountered E. sachalinensis at The Case Estates, an "extension" of Arnold Arboretum in Wayland, Massachusetts, where it was espaliered to show off in spectacular fashion the bounty of dangling fruits.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Thanks for the onion ID, Mark!  Let me know if you want to try some more Dalea seeds.  Other than scarifying them, I have no other suggestions on how to germinate them (as, to be honest, I just chucked the original batch of seeds out along the fence and they came up on their own).  

Beautiful Euonymus!  

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Rick, have you grown either Euonymus planipes or Euonymus sachalinensis?  Anyone else in colder zones?  I'm looking for some encouragement that these could possibly be hardy in zone 3, needless to say. 

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Hoy wrote:

it is very common here that early spring flowering plants have an autumn flowering period too.

Interesting... and enviable.  I was going to attribute the general absence of such behavior here (or, at least, in my yard) to a very short season, but I guess you have a darned short season too.  Maybe the difference is related to climate then?  The end of our season is certainly very final, when everything is frozen off.

Cyananthus are later-blooming rock-garden plants.... Most species tend to have blue flowers but here's a macro of a pale yellow-flowered species, Cyananthus macrocalyx, that has been blooming sporadically here since mid-summer:

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Boy, that feathery whatever it is at the base of the petals on that cyanthanthus is really cool!

Lori wrote:

Rick, have you grown either Euonymus planipes or Euonymus sachalinensis?

Mark sent me some E. planipes sachalinensis seedlings last fall. (Thanks, Mark!)  They weathered the winter just fine in pots and in the ground.  (Remember that rabbits love anything euonymus, though.)  I've not grown E. sachalinensis, but E. hamitonianus var. sieboldianus, E. nanus var. turkestanicus, E. bungeana and E. verrucosus all do well here.  I have a friend in zone 3 that grows E. bungeana.  Though all of these a very nice in their own right, none are like planipes or sachalinensis, in my opinion.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

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